Doby Photography/NPR
Brian Naylor 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Brian Naylor

Correspondent, Washington Desk

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.

In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies, including transportation and homeland security.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many of the major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

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While the government dodged a bullet this time by avoiding the latest malware attack, experts say its systems are still vulnerable. Intrepid00/Flickr hide caption

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Intrepid00/Flickr

Federal Computers Dodge Global Malware Attack ... This Time

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Former national security adviser Michael Flynn won't turn over documents to the Senate Intelligence Committee, a source close to Flynn tells NPR. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

President Trump speaks in the White House Rose Garden following the House passage of the Republican health care bill on Thursday. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Trump 'Confident' About GOP Health Care Bill's Prospects In The Senate

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President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with the National Association of Manufacturers in March in the Roosevelt Room of the White House. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Help Wanted: The Trump Administration (Still) Has Some Openings To Fill

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President Trump reaches to shake hands with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg during a news conference in the East Room of the White House on Wednesday. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Trump, In A 180-Degree Switch, Says NATO 'No Longer Obsolete'

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The number of people who have been asked to hand over their cellphones and passwords by Customs and Border Protection agents has increased nearly threefold in recent years. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

More Travelers Entering U.S. Are Being Asked For Their Cellphones And Passwords

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U.S. Border Patrol Agents Step Up Cellphone Searches

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Under a rarely used law, lawmakers have voted to repeal more than a dozen regulations enacted in the last six months of the Obama administration. denis_pc/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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