Brian Naylor NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.

President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with the National Association of Manufacturers in March in the Roosevelt Room of the White House. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Help Wanted: The Trump Administration (Still) Has Some Openings To Fill

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President Trump reaches to shake hands with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg during a news conference in the East Room of the White House on Wednesday. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Trump, In A 180-Degree Switch, Says NATO 'No Longer Obsolete'

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The number of people who have been asked to hand over their cellphones and passwords by Customs and Border Protection agents has increased nearly threefold in recent years. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

More Travelers Entering U.S. Are Being Asked For Their Cellphones And Passwords

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U.S. Border Patrol Agents Step Up Cellphone Searches

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Under a rarely used law, lawmakers have voted to repeal more than a dozen regulations enacted in the last six months of the Obama administration. denis_pc/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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denis_pc/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Senate Select Intelligence Committee Chairman Sen. Richard Burr, right, confers with ranking member Sen. Mark Warner, left, during a hearing of the Senate Select Intelligence Committee Thursday in Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

President Trump's son-in-law and top adviser, Jared Kushner, will talk to the Senate Intelligence Committee. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Trump Son-In-Law Jared Kushner To Be Questioned By Senate Intel Panel Over Russia

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