High Drama Dominates Debt Ceiling Talks

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Conservatives, Progressives Discuss Debt Ceiling

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States Warily Watch Debt-Ceiling Impasse

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The new Automated Target Recognition software eliminates passenger-specific images and replaces them with generic outlines. Courtesy of Transportation Security Administration hide caption

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Courtesy of Transportation Security Administration

With Modesty In Mind, TSA Rolls Out New Body Scans

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FAA In Limbo After Congress Misses Deadline

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Pedestrians stop to view the National Debt Clock in New York this April. The debt ceiling is becoming an election issue, as groups on both sides spend millions on TV ads. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Debt Ceiling Debate Sparks New Round Of TV Ad Wars

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Firefighters in the nation's capital (shown near the White House in 2004) have some fairly sophisticated communication devices. But those devices use the same commercial networks as D.C.-area residents. In an emergency, those networks can get crowded. Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images

Many First Responders Still Struggle To Communicate

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Lawmakers Butt Heads In High-Speed Rail Debate

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Mayors Want War Money Spent At Home

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Rep. Weiner Could Lose N.Y. District In Redistricting

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Pilot Gregg Pointon shows off the cockpit of a Boeing 787 flight simulator. GPS navigation is the basis for a new air traffic control system the government plans to build, but a company's plan to expand broadband Internet could interfere with GPS signals. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

GPS Users Fear Getting Lost In Wireless Expansion

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FEMA Director William Craig Fugate speaks to the media as U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano (left) and American Red Cross President and CEO Gail McGovern (right) listen after a meeting with President Obama at the White House earlier this month. Obama was briefed on the 2011 hurricane season. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

New Storms, Prior Disasters Burden FEMA's Budget

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Kimmy Lankford and her 5-year-old son, Jack, walk through their neighborhood Wednesday after a massive tornado passed through the town. The Lankfords continue to live in their home a few blocks away, which was damaged but remains habitable. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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After String Of Disasters, FEMA Fund Gets A Boost

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The Japan Animal Rescue shelter in Samukawa houses about 200 dogs and cats, most of them brought in from the now off-limits area around the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. Brian Naylor/NPR hide caption

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Risky Rescue: Saving Pets From Japan Exclusion Zone

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A man holds a placard during a march denouncing the use of nuclear plants and power during a demonstration in Tokyo on May 1. Toru Yamanaka /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Toru Yamanaka /AFP/Getty Images

Japan Backs Off Of Nuclear Power After Public Outcry

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