Brian Naylor 2010 i
Doby Photography/NPR
Brian Naylor 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Brian Naylor

Correspondent, Washington Desk

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.

In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies, including transportation and homeland security.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many of the major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

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Salvadoran Gen. Carlos Eugenio Vides Casanova, shown in an undated photo, is alleged to have presided over human rights violations in that country, including the murders of four Americans in 1980. AP hide caption

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Then-U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton (center) types on her cellphone with Roberta S. Jacobson, U.S. assistant secretary of state for Western Hemisphere Affairs (left), and U.S. Ambassador to Brazil Thomas Shannon in Brasilia, Brazil, before heading to Brussels in 2012. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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