Doby Photography/NPR
Brian Naylor 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Brian Naylor

Correspondent, Washington Desk

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.

In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies, including transportation and homeland security.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many of the major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

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President Trump's son-in-law and top adviser, Jared Kushner, will talk to the Senate Intelligence Committee. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Trump Son-In-Law Jared Kushner To Be Questioned By Senate Intel Panel Over Russia

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Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch hears senators' opening statements on Monday for the first day of his confirmation hearings. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

FAA Eases Up On Electronic Devices On Flights

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Denver Health Medical Center's primary care clinic is located in a low-income neighborhood in southwest Denver. The recent expansion of Medicaid, which serves low-income Americans as well as the elderly and people with disabilities, would be rolled back under the new Republican health care plan. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

President Trump has hundreds of vacancies to fill but also believes many are "unnecessary." Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Trump Has Many Jobs Unfilled; Is He 'Deconstructing The Administrative State'?

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Former President George W. Bush holds an event at his presidential library and museum in Dallas on Feb. 28 for his exhibit of veterans portraits. In interviews about his artwork, Bush has been commenting on the current administration. Laura Buckman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Laura Buckman/AFP/Getty Images