Doby Photography/NPR
Brian Naylor 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Brian Naylor

Correspondent, Washington Desk

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.

In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies, including transportation and homeland security.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many of the major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

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Story Archive

The Trump administration is expected to outline how it will implement its modified travel ban on people from six majority-Muslim nations. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

President Trump Looks To Slash Nearly 4,000 Interior Department Jobs

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A database with the information of nearly 200 million people was discovered by a cyber-risk analyst. The voter information had been compiled by a marketing firm contracted by Republican groups. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Democratic candidate for Georgia's 6th Congressional District Jon Ossoff speaks to supporters during an election-night watch party in Dunwoody, Ga., in April. John Bazemore/AP hide caption

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John Bazemore/AP

Costliest Congressional Race In History Sees First Debate

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Democrats Spend Big In Georgia's Special Election To Fill House Seat

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Lawmakers Propose Subjecting Secret Service Director To Senate Confirmation

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While the government dodged a bullet this time by avoiding the latest malware attack, experts say its systems are still vulnerable. Intrepid00/Flickr hide caption

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Federal Computers Dodge Global Malware Attack ... This Time

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Former national security adviser Michael Flynn won't turn over documents to the Senate Intelligence Committee, a source close to Flynn tells NPR. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP