Lynn Neary Lynn Neary is an NPR arts correspondent and a frequent guest host often heard on Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

A fan holds a copy of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows at a book release party at Scholastic headquarters in New York in 2007. Clark Jones/AP hide caption

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Clark Jones/AP

Harry Potter Inc. Hopes To Re-Create The Magic, Hogwarts And All, With 'Cursed Child'

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In 'The Girls,' A Teen's Need To Be Noticed Draws Her Into A Manson-Like Cult

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Perkins and Wolfe lean over the novelist's unwieldy manuscript. Marc Brenner/Roadside Attractions hide caption

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Marc Brenner/Roadside Attractions

The Editor's Epic: Maxwell Perkins Makes For An Unlikely Big-Screen Hero

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Emma Straub says she didn't want to write yet another book set in Brooklyn — and then she hit on Ditmas Park. Jennifer Bastian hide caption

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Jennifer Bastian

Exploring The 'Quiet New York' With Emma Straub

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How much ice is just right, legally? Marco Arment/Flickr hide caption

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Marco Arment/Flickr

Ice Is Nice, But Do I Have To Say Venti To Get A Large Coffee?

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Empty storefronts line the streets of Northern Cambria, Pa., Jennifer Haigh's hometown. Rob Arnold hide caption

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Rob Arnold

'Heat & Light' Digs For The Soul Of Coal Country

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Cairo's Tahrir Square (seen here in January) isn't actually a square — it's a traffic circle. And today, years after it was the site of anti-government demonstrations, it's a beautifully manicured, sterile space. Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images

From Tahrir To Tiananmen, 'City Squares' Can't Escape Their History

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Robert McCloskey was still a young artist when he brought a crate of ducks back to his studio apartment to do some sketches. Since then, the plucky Mallard family (Jack, Lack, Mack, et al.) has charmed its way into our hearts. Penguin Young Readers Group hide caption

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Penguin Young Readers Group

Make Way For Celebration: These Ducklings Are Turning 75

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Dietland and 13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl Brandon Chew/NPR hide caption

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Brandon Chew/NPR

'You Cannot Shame Me': 2 New Books Tear Down 'Fat Girl' Stereotypes

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It took a little over a year for Sara Baume's debut novel — about a troubled man who adopts a one-eyed dog — to go from being accepted for publication to being published. "I made the clay dogs to keep the thing alive for myself after it was finished, but before it was a book," she writes on her blog. Sara Baume hide caption

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Sara Baume

For A Young Irish Artist And Author, Words Are Anchored In Images

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'The Martian' Started As A Self-Published Book

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Austin Reed was an indentured servant who set fire to his employer's farmhouse after he was whipped for "idleness." Reed was sent to The House of Refuge, the nation's first juvenile reformatory, and later sentenced to serve in New York's Auburn State Prison (above) in 1840. Courtesy of Penguin Random House hide caption

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Courtesy of Penguin Random House

Written Behind Bars, This 1850s Memoir Links Prisons To Plantations

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Actor Gregory Peck and novelist Harper Lee in 1962, on the set of the Universal Pictures release To Kill A Mockingbird, in which Peck plays Atticus Finch. Bettmann/Corbis hide caption

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Bettmann/Corbis

The Measure Of Harper Lee: A Life Shaped By A Towering Text

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'To Kill A Mockingbird' Author Harper Lee Dies

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It was recently announced that Aaron Sorkin will be adapting To Kill A Mockingbird for Broadway. Above, Scout's legs are tired after a particularly long "walk and talk." (Not really.) Above, Gregory Peck as Atticus Finch with Mary Badham as Scout and Phillip Alford as Jem in the 1962 film adaptation of Harper Lee's novel. Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images hide caption

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Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images

To Sorkin A Mockingbird: Screenwriter Will Adapt Novel For Broadway

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