Schrafft's was a chain of restaurants, with a candy store attached, that catered to ladies who lunch. To NPR's Lynn Neary, who used to waitress there, Schrafft's "always felt like the epicenter of the comfort zone." MCNY/Gottscho-Schleisner/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
MCNY/Gottscho-Schleisner/Getty Images

Jose Vazquez holds a book he found during the D.C. Public Library's banned book scavenger hunt. Jose Vazquez hide caption

toggle caption
Jose Vazquez

In Banned Books Scavenger Hunt, The Prize Is Literary 'Smut'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/494119440/494127997" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Six novelists have made it to the shortlist, the last step in the Man Booker Prize competition. The 2016 finalists are from Britain, the U.S. and Canada. Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images

Amor Towles likes to write about the past, but says he is not driven by historical research. He prefers instead to play in between what is real and what is imagined. His first novel was called Rules of Civility. Courtesy of Amor Towles hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Amor Towles

Idea For 'Gentleman In Moscow' Came From Many Nights In Luxury Hotels

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/492434255/492775695" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jacqueline Woodson is also the author of Brown Girl Dreaming, Miracle's Boys, Show Way and Feathers. Juna F. Nagle/Amistad hide caption

toggle caption
Juna F. Nagle/Amistad

Jacqueline Woodson's New Novel For Adults Has Its Roots In Adolescence

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/489341628/489512831" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sophisticated ways of tracking reading habits give publishers hard data that reveals the kinds of books people want to read. But a veteran editor says numbers only go so far in telling the story. Kathy Willens/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Kathy Willens/AP

Publishers' Dilemma: Judge A Book By Its Data Or Trust The Editor's Gut?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/488382297/488412887" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Can Serialized Fiction Convert Binge Watchers Into Binge Readers?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/484171813/487522900" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Shooting In Baton Rouge Leaves 3 Officers Dead

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/486378479/486380773" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A fan holds a copy of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows at a book release party at Scholastic headquarters in New York in 2007. Clark Jones/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Clark Jones/AP

Harry Potter Inc. Hopes To Re-Create The Magic, Hogwarts And All, With 'Cursed Child'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/482750898/482750899" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In 'The Girls,' A Teen's Need To Be Noticed Draws Her Into A Manson-Like Cult

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/482231289/482363018" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Perkins and Wolfe lean over the novelist's unwieldy manuscript. Marc Brenner/Roadside Attractions hide caption

toggle caption
Marc Brenner/Roadside Attractions

The Editor's Epic: Maxwell Perkins Makes For An Unlikely Big-Screen Hero

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/481545703/481667088" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Emma Straub says she didn't want to write yet another book set in Brooklyn — and then she hit on Ditmas Park. Jennifer Bastian hide caption

toggle caption
Jennifer Bastian

Exploring The 'Quiet New York' With Emma Straub

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/480605612/480820225" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

How much ice is just right, legally? Marco Arment/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Marco Arment/Flickr

Ice Is Nice, But Do I Have To Say Venti To Get A Large Coffee?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/477073457/477141314" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Empty storefronts line the streets of Northern Cambria, Pa., Jennifer Haigh's hometown. Rob Arnold hide caption

toggle caption
Rob Arnold

'Heat & Light' Digs For The Soul Of Coal Country

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476775276/476783633" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cairo's Tahrir Square (seen here in January) isn't actually a square — it's a traffic circle. And today, years after it was the site of anti-government demonstrations, it's a beautifully manicured, sterile space. Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images

From Tahrir To Tiananmen, 'City Squares' Can't Escape Their History

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475265075/476380477" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript