Lynn Neary
Max Hirshfeld

Lynn Neary

Correspondent, Arts Desk and Guest Host

Lynn Neary is an NPR arts correspondent and a frequent guest host often heard on Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

In her role on the Arts desk, Neary reports on an industry in transition as publishing moves into the digital age. As she covers books and publishing, she relishes the opportunity to interview many of her favorite authors from Barbara Kingsolver to Ian McEwan.

Arriving at NPR in 1982, Neary spent two years working as a newscaster during Morning Edition. Then, for the next eight years, Neary was the host of Weekend All Things Considered. In 1992, she joined the cultural desk to develop NPR's first religion beat. As religion correspondent, Neary covered the country's diverse religious landscape and the politics of the religious right.

Over the years Neary has won numerous prestigious awards including the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism award, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting Gold Award, an Ohio State Award, an Association of Women in Radio and Television Award and the Gabriel award. For her reporting on the role of religion in the debate over welfare reform, Neary shared in NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton Award.

A Fordham University graduate with a Bachelor of Arts in English, Neary thinks she has the ideal job and suspects she is the envy of English majors everywhere.

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Played by Olivier or not — Heathcliff was really kind of a jerk by romance hero standards. United Artists hide caption

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Alan Rickman is reunited with his Sense and Sensibility co-star Kate Winslet in his latest directorial effort, A Little Chaos. Courtesy of BBC Films hide caption

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In 2014, BookCon responded to the We Need Diverse Books campaign by inviting it to form its own panel. Pictured here (from left): I.W. Gregorio, Mike Jung, Matt de la Pena, Grace Lin and Jacqueline Woodson. Courtesy of ReedPOP hide caption

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Protesters gathered on the steps of the New York Public Library on Wednesday to show support for silenced Chinese writers. Frank Franklin II/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Frank Franklin II/AP

Chef, cookbook author and owner of Washington, D.C.'s Restaurant Nora, Nora Pouillon, in the restaurant's garden. Courtesy of Noras.com hide caption

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Actor Mark Rylance, seen here as Thomas Cromwell in Masterpiece's Wolf Hall, views Cromwell as a survivor who knows how to manipulate power to his advantage. "He has the mind of a chess player," Rylance says. Giles Keyte/Playground & Company Pictures for Masterpiece/BBC hide caption

itoggle caption Giles Keyte/Playground & Company Pictures for Masterpiece/BBC
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