Lynn Neary
Max Hirshfeld

Lynn Neary

Correspondent, Arts Desk and Guest Host

Lynn Neary is an NPR arts correspondent and a frequent guest host often heard on Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

In her role on the Arts desk, Neary reports on an industry in transition as publishing moves into the digital age. As she covers books and publishing, she relishes the opportunity to interview many of her favorite authors from Barbara Kingsolver to Ian McEwan.

Arriving at NPR in 1982, Neary spent two years working as a newscaster during Morning Edition. Then, for the next eight years, Neary was the host of Weekend All Things Considered. In 1992, she joined the cultural desk to develop NPR's first religion beat. As religion correspondent, Neary covered the country's diverse religious landscape and the politics of the religious right.

Over the years Neary has won numerous prestigious awards including the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism award, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting Gold Award, an Ohio State Award, an Association of Women in Radio and Television Award and the Gabriel award. For her reporting on the role of religion in the debate over welfare reform, Neary shared in NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton Award.

A Fordham University graduate with a Bachelor of Arts in English, Neary thinks she has the ideal job and suspects she is the envy of English majors everywhere.

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Heather Landis

Author John Irving says his new book was inspired by photos of young circus performers in India and Mexico. Everett Irving hide caption

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Pamuk himself drew this illustration; he says at the time, all the buildings existed only in his imagination. Jun Tsuboike/NPR hide caption

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Jun Tsuboike/NPR

A survey from the Authors Guild reveals a 30 percent decline in author income since 2009. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Joyce Carol Oates, pictured above on Easter, 1949. It is strange, she says, to live so long that you are older than your own parents were when they died. She uses the word "vertiginous" to describe the dizzying sensation of looking back on your life from a distance you can't believe you've traveled. Courtesy of Random House hide caption

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Stieg Larsson died in 2004, never knowing how popular his Millennium books would become. Britt-Marie Trensmar hide caption

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Courtesy of Carl- Johan Forssen Ehrlin

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