A tiny bacteriophage virus can cripple the bacteria that cause troublesome acne on teens' skin. Charles Bowman/University of Pittsburgh hide caption

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Shots - Health News

Doctors Strike Mutating Bacteria In Teen Acne Battle

As acne bacteria develop resistance to antibiotic treatments, doctors turn to zit-fighting viruses.

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More elderly drivers will hit the road in the next decade, but family members wonder: When is it time for elderly loved ones to move to the passenger seat? Martin Novak/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Doctors may recommend that obese patients use weight-loss drugs to trick their hunger pangs. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Eating low-glycemic foods, or foods that take longer to digest, may help you feel fuller for a longer period of time. Robyn Mackenzie/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Mammograms may pose a particular risk to women with genetic mutations that predispose them to breast cancer. Bill Branson/National Cancer Institute hide caption

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Federal health officials recommend 1,000 milligrams of calcium per day for people younger than 50, but some are overdoing it. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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When it comes to learning how to drive, your teen is probably as harried as you are. Research shows that scare tactics meant to instill caution, though, are less effective than kind words. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Health

Cheer Up: It's Just Your Child Behind The Wheel

Sure, teaching your kids to drive can be nerve-wracking. New research shows that positive reinforcement goes a long way toward instilling safe driving practices.

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Young activists distribute condoms at an AIDS awareness event in Ashbury Park, N.J. Charles Sykes/AP hide caption

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A promising crop of new migraine treatments could alleviate the suffering of millions of Americans. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Contact with animals and dirty environments may be one reason farm kids are less likely to get allergies, researchers say. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Some fear that with rising medical costs and an aging population, the country's nursing staff will be stretched too thin. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Douglas Harlow Brown, 80, of East Lansing, Mich., watches birds inside a medical rehab facility. Brittney Lohmiller for NPR hide caption

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