Parents can minimize the negative impact of their arguments on their children using a few simple techniques to calm down. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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How To Turn Down The Heat On Fiery Family Arguments

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An older man performs exercises in Mumbai, India. Research suggests that moderate physical exercise may be the best way to keep our brains healthy as we age. Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP hide caption

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How Exercise And Other Activities Beat Back Dementia

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Reducing dietary salt and alcohol, exercising, not smoking and maintaining a healthy weight are other lifestyle tweaks known to help prevent or reduce high blood pressure, doctors say. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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Study Hints Vitamin D Might Help Curb High Blood Pressure

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A JAMA Psychiatry study found that 1 in 7 mothers are affected by postpartum depression. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Postpartum Depression Affects 1 In 7 Mothers

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Good advice, but strict rules at mealtime may backfire. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Selling Kids On Veggies When Rules Like 'Clean Your Plate' Fail

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Yvonne Condes helps her son Alec get ready for baseball practice. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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In Many Families, Exercise Is By Appointment Only

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A new poll explores what happens in American households during the hours between school and bedtime. Image courtesy of The Bishop family (left), The Benavides family (top right), NPR (center) and The Jacobs family (bottom right) hide caption

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How 'Crunch Time' Between School And Sleep Shapes Kids' Health

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Brad McDonald and his 14-year-old daughter, Madalyn, are working to understand each other during her teenage years. Courtesy of Brad McDonald hide caption

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How Parents Can Learn To Tame A Testy Teenager

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Some parents have worried that kids get too many vaccinations too quickly. A review of all the available research suggests those concerns are misplaced. Dmitry Naumov/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Schedule Of Childhood Vaccines Declared Safe

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A cigarette warning label image approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Food and Drug Administration hide caption

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Members of the boys basketball team from Dimond High School in Anchorage, Alaska, celebrate their 2012 state championship victory. Psychological research shows that sports camaraderie improves teenagers' mental health. Charles Pulliam/AP hide caption

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Why Exercise May Do A Teenage Mind Good

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Dr. Jame Abraham used positron emission tomography, or PET, scans to understand differences in brain metabolism before and after chemotherapy. Dr. Jame Abraham hide caption

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Another Side Effect Of Chemotherapy: 'Chemo Brain'

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According to a study published in Pediatrics, boys are entering puberty six months to two years earlier than they did in past studies. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Like Girls, Boys Are Entering Puberty Earlier

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Fraud victims are more likely to have opened official-looking sweepstakes notices and other mailings. A new study says the elderly are more susceptible than the young to being swindled. Allen Breed/AP hide caption

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Why It's Easier To Scam The Elderly

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In the U.K.-based program called Txt2stop, researchers sent smokers encouraging text messages, like the one above, to help them quit. Karen Castillo Farfán/NPR hide caption

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Text Messages Help Smokers Kick The Habit

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