Patricia Neighmond
Murray Bognowitz/N/A

Patti Neighmond

Correspondent, Health Policy, Science Desk

Award-winning journalist Patti Neighmond is NPR's health policy correspondent. Her reports air regularly on NPR newsmagazines All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

Based in Los Angeles, Neighmond has covered health care policy since April 1987. She joined NPR's staff in 1981, covering local New York City news as well as the United Nations. In 1984, she became a producer for NPR's science unit and specialized in science and environmental issues.

Neighmond has earned a broad array of awards for her reporting. In 1993, she received the prestigious George Foster Peabody Award for coverage of health reform. That same year she received the Robert F. Kennedy Award for a story on a young quadriplegic who convinced Georgia officials that she could live at home less expensively and more happily than in a nursing home. In 1990 she won the World Hunger Award for a story about healthcare and low-income children. Neighmond received two awards in 1989: a George Polk Award for her powerful ten-part series on AIDS patient Archie Harrison, who was taking the anti-viral drug AZT; and a Major Armstrong Award for her series on the Canadian health care system. The Population Institute, based in Washington, DC, has presented its radio documentary award to Neighmond twice: in 1988 for "Family Planning in India" and in 1984 for her coverage of overpopulation in Mexico. Her 1987 report "AIDS and Doctors" won the National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism, and her two-part series on the aquaculture industry earned the 1986 American Association for the Advancement of Science Award.

Neighmond began her career in journalism in 1978, at the Pacifica Foundation's Washington D.C. bureau, where she covered Capitol Hill and the White House. She began freelance reporting for NPR from New York City in 1980. Neighmond earned her bachelor's degree in English and drama from the University of Maryland, and now lives in Los Angeles with her husband and two children.

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Does Testosterone Improve Older Men's Health? It Depends

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Got Back Pain? Try Yoga Or Massage Before Reaching For The Pills

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Sixty-three percent of women who used the Paxman cooling device said they used wigs or head wraps to cover up hair loss, compared to 100 percent of women who didn't try cooling. Courtesy of Baylor College of Medicine hide caption

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Courtesy of Baylor College of Medicine

Cooling Cap May Limit Chemo Hair Loss In Women With Breast Cancer

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Depression Strikes Today's Teen Girls Especially Hard

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Heat and steam from your shower or shave can rob medicine of its potency long before the drug's expiration date. Angela Cappetta/Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Cappetta/Getty Images

When Old Medicine Goes Bad

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Salma Shabaik holds her newborn son, Ali. When he was born, she held him naked against her bare skin, a practice called kangaroo care. Ali is wearing an ear cap to correct a lop ear. Morgan Walker for NPR hide caption

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Morgan Walker for NPR

Kangaroo Care Helps Preemies And Full Term Babies, Too

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The highly rated variety of medical marijuana known as "Blue Dream" was displayed among other strains at a cannabis farmers market in Los Angeles in 2014. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Marijuana's Health Effects? Top Scientists Weigh In

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The HPV vaccine has reduced the prevalence of the cancer-causing human papillomavirus by as much as 65 percent among those who are vaccinated. Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images

Advice For Doctors Talking To Parents About HPV Vaccine: Make It Brief

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When Morton Pollner was diagnosed with lung cancer at age 76, he thought it was a death sentence. Michael Rubenstein for NPR hide caption

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Michael Rubenstein for NPR

Older Patients Can Benefit From Lung Cancer Surgery

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Peanuts and straight peanut butter are a choking hazard for infants, doctors say, but a bit of watered-down puree of peanut butter, starting at around 6-months-old, can help prevent peanut allergies. Brian Hagiwara/Getty Images hide caption

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Hey, Baby, Meet Peanuts: How And When To Safely Introduce The Food

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Lack Of Child Care Rating Systems Leaves Parents In A Bind

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Poll: Cost Of Child Care Causes Financial Stress For Many Families

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Why Parents Don't Get Their Children Vaccinated For The Flu

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Iris and Eli Fugate with their 6-month-old son Jack, at the family's home in San Diego. Thanks to California's paid family leave law, Iris was able to take six weeks off when Jack was born, and Eli took three weeks, with plans to take the remaining time over the next few months. Sandy Huffaker for NPR hide caption

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Sandy Huffaker for NPR

How California's 'Paid Family Leave' Law Buys Time For New Parents

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