Jackie Northam
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Jackie Northam

Correspondent, Foreign Affairs

Jackie Northam is Foreign Affairs correspondent for NPR news. The veteran journalist has more than two decades of experience covering the world's hot spots and reporting on a broad tapestry of international and foreign policy issues.

Based in Washington, D.C., Northam is assigned to the leading stories of the day, traveling regularly overseas to report the news - from Afghanistan and Pakistan, to earthquake-ravaged Haiti.

Northam just completed a five year stint as NPR's National Security Correspondent, covering US defense and intelligence policies. She led the network's coverage of the US military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, traveling regularly to the controversial base to report on conditions there, and on US efforts to prosecute detainees.

Northam spent more than a decade as a foreign correspondent. She reported from Beirut during the war between Hezbollah and Israel in 2006, from Iraq after the fall of Saddam Hussein, and from Saudi Arabia during the first Gulf War. She lived in and reported extensively from Southeast Asia, Indochina, and Eastern Europe, where she charted the fall of communism.

While based in Nairobi, Kenya, Northam covered the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. She managed to enter the country just days after the slaughter of ethnic Tutsis began by hitching a ride with a French priest who was helping Rwandans escape to neighboring Burundi.

A native of Canada, Northam's first overseas reporting post was London, where she spent seven years covering stories on Margaret Thatcher's Britain and efforts to create the European Union.

Northam has received multiple journalism awards during her career, including Associated Press awards, regional Edward R. Murrow awards, and was part of an NPR team journalists that won an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

More from Jackie Northam

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President-elect Donald Trump, seen here on Nov. 22, spoke with Pakistan's Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif on Wednesday. Trump showered praise on Sharif despite the tensions between the two countries in recent years. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Trump Gushes About Pakistan In Call With Its Prime Minister

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Hotel employees watch Donald Trump following a ribbon-cutting ceremony at the new Trump International Hotel on Oct. 26 in Washington, D.C. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Trump's Loans From Troubled German Bank Pose Conflict Of Interest

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President-elect Donald Trump, flanked by his wife and grown children, cuts a ribbon during the grand opening of the Trump International Hotel, just a few blocks from the White House, on Oct. 26. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Trump's Rejection Of TPP Paves Way For China To Strike Asian Trade Deals

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President Obama, here meeting with President-elect Donald Trump in the Oval Office on Thursday, apparently won't push Congress to implement the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal which Trump is expected to scuttle when he takes over. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

How U.S. Trade Policy Could Change Under The Trump Administration

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Chinese billionaire Wang Jianlin, chairman of the Dalian Wanda Group, has been buying up Hollywood entertainment properties in recent years. His company said Friday it would buy Dick Clark Productions for about $1 billion. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

Chinese Mogul Buys Dick Clark Productions, His Latest U.S. Purchase

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Wallonia leader Paul Magnette speaks to the media Wednesday prior to a meeting with Belgium's leaders. Wallonia objected to parts of a major European Union-Canada trade deal that was seven years in the making. But Magnette said Thursday he was willing accept the revised terms. Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images

Wallonia's premier, Paul Magnette, (center) leaves Tuesday after talks at Belgium's Foreign Ministry on the trade agreement between the European Union and Canada. All 29 governments involved support the deal, which has been seven years in the making, but Wallonia's opposition is blocking the deal. A signing ceremony had been set for Thursday. Jasper Jacobs /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jasper Jacobs /AFP/Getty Images

Crown Prince To Succeed Thai King Who Died After 70-Year Reign

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Teodoro Nguema Obiang Mangue, the vice president of Equatorial Guinea and son of the president, cuts his birthday cake in 2010. The Justice Department says he went on a $100 million shopping spree in the U.S. with money stolen from his homeland. Some $30 million was recovered. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

When Kleptocrats Bring Money Into The U.S., There's Now A Plan To Seize It

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The United Nations humanitarian coordinator for Yemen, Jamie McGoldrick (center, in light blue shirt) inspects a funeral hall on Monday, two days after it was destroyed in Sanaa, Yemen, in an airstrike by a Saudi-led coalition. At least 140 people were killed. Hani Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Hani Mohammed/AP

As Yemen's War Worsens, Questions Grow About The U.S. Role

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte addresses army troops near Manila on Tuesday. As the U.S. and the Philippines began annual military exercises, the president said it might be for the last time, adding that, "Mr. Obama, you can go to hell." Bullit Marquez/AP hide caption

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Bullit Marquez/AP

He Did It Again: Philippine President Keeps Insulting The U.S. (And Obama)

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U.S. Officials Approve Deal With Iran For Boeing Planes

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Khalid al-Falih is shown at a conference in Riyadh in January, when he was still chairman of Saudi Arabia's state oil giant, Saudi Aramco. He became the country's oil minister in May. Saudi Arabia has been looking to diversify its holdings, and Aramco is reportedly looking to buy an oil refinery near the port of Houston. Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images

As Saudi Arabia Diversifies, A Texas Oil Refinery May Be In Its Future

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