Jackie Northam
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Jackie Northam

Correspondent, Foreign Affairs

Jackie Northam is Foreign Affairs correspondent for NPR news. The veteran journalist has more than two decades of experience covering the world's hot spots and reporting on a broad tapestry of international and foreign policy issues.

Based in Washington, D.C., Northam is assigned to the leading stories of the day, traveling regularly overseas to report the news - from Afghanistan and Pakistan, to earthquake-ravaged Haiti.

Northam just completed a five year stint as NPR's National Security Correspondent, covering US defense and intelligence policies. She led the network's coverage of the US military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, traveling regularly to the controversial base to report on conditions there, and on US efforts to prosecute detainees.

Northam spent more than a decade as a foreign correspondent. She reported from Beirut during the war between Hezbollah and Israel in 2006, from Iraq after the fall of Saddam Hussein, and from Saudi Arabia during the first Gulf War. She lived in and reported extensively from Southeast Asia, Indochina, and Eastern Europe, where she charted the fall of communism.

While based in Nairobi, Kenya, Northam covered the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. She managed to enter the country just days after the slaughter of ethnic Tutsis began by hitching a ride with a French priest who was helping Rwandans escape to neighboring Burundi.

A native of Canada, Northam's first overseas reporting post was London, where she spent seven years covering stories on Margaret Thatcher's Britain and efforts to create the European Union.

Northam has received multiple journalism awards during her career, including Associated Press awards, regional Edward R. Murrow awards, and was part of an NPR team journalists that won an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

More from Jackie Northam

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Chicago-based aircraft manufacturer Boeing would not divulge details about its deal with Iran Air — not the number of aircraft involved, the specific models or the price tag. Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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U.S.-Russia Relations Are Frosty But They're Toasty On The Arctic Council

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Father Of Orlando Gunman Saddened By Nightclub Massacre

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After Nuclear Deal, Iran Pulls Quick Oil Production Rebound

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A farmer handles a bag of Syngenta's bean seeds on a farm near Johannesburg, South Africa. Waldo Swiegers/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Lawmakers Scrutinize China's Bid To Buy Agrichemical Giant Syngenta

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Vietnamese navy officers (in white) talk with U.S. sailors aboard the guided missile destroyer USS Chafee in the central Vietnamese city of Danang in 2012. The two countries have increased military cooperation in recent years and President Obama announced Monday that he was lifting the ban on weapons sales to Vietnam. Hoang Dinh Nam/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Now That Vietnam Can Buy U.S. Weapons, What Will It Want?

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The Chinese company Fuling Plastic set up a plant in Allentown, Pa., last year. The company, which makes straws and other plastic products, supplies fast food chains. Chinese companies are expected to invest about $30 billion in the U.S. this year, doubling the record set last year. Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

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China Ramps Up U.S. Investments, From Straws To Semiconductors

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Injured Doctors Without Borders staff find shelter in a safe room after an airstrike on their hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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As War Dangers Multiply, Doctors Without Borders Struggles To Adapt

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This photo dated April 1977 shows Megumi Yokota, who was kidnapped by North Korean agents later the same year. Megumi was one of eight Japanese nationals who Pyongyang confirmed were dead in 2002. North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il apologized for the kidnapping at an historic meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi. -/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Relatives Of Japanese Taken By North Korea Still Hope To Find Loved Ones

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Syrian Raed Saleh came to Washington to receive an award for his rescue work in his homeland. However, he was turned back at Dulles International Airport outside Washington. No reason was given. In his honor, those attending the Tuesday evening banquet wore white helmets, a symbol of his group, Syria Civil Defense. Courtesy of Relief International hide caption

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A Syrian Lands In The U.S. For An Award, Only To Be Turned Back

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Boeing Explores Doing Business With Iran's Commercial Airlines

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The U.S. Helps Foreign Banks Navigate Restrictions On Iran

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The prime minister's official residence at 24 Sussex Drive in Ottawa is drafty and leaky, and just about every part of it needs to be repaired. Margaret Trudeau, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's mother, calls it "the crown jewel of the federal penitentiary system." National Capital Commission/Flickr hide caption

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Canada's Official Residence, No Longer Fit For A Prime Minister

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