Obama Appoints Four New Ambassadors
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Holbrooke Death Comes At Key Point In Afghan Policy
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Richard Holbrooke, U.S. special representative to Afghanistan and Pakistan, takes part in a discussion on international security in Passau, Germany, on Nov. 12. hide caption

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Veteran U.S. Diplomat Richard Holbrooke Dies
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Cables Suggest U.S. Knew Of Sudan Arms Shipments
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South Korean Gen. Han Min-koo looks at houses destroyed by North Korea's Nov. 23 shelling of Yeonpyeong Island. Two weeks after the attack, the rivals are still trading threats, while tensions are also rising between South Korea's ally, the U.S., and China, an ally of North Korea. Kim Ju-sung/AP/Yonhap hide caption

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U.S.-China Tensions Intensify Over Korean Crisis
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As Afghan Conflict Escalates, What Went Wrong?
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U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan Karl Eikenberry. Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ambassador Karl Eikenberry
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Afghan President Karzai Presents Challenge To U.S.
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Afghan President Hamid Karzai. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Ambassador Karl Eikenberry
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Soldiers from the Army's 101st Airborne Division walk along high mud walls in a village in Afghanistan's Kandahar province. The Obama administration later this month will release its annual review of the war strategy. Afghanistan's history does not offer encouragement. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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For Invaders, A Well-Worn Path Out Of Afghanistan
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The leaked WikiLeaks cables highlight two pervasive challenges the U.S. faces in Afghanistan: corruption and dealing with President Hamid Karzai. Shah Marai/Getty Images hide caption

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Cables Shed Light On Complex U.S.-Afghan Ties
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Cables Reveal U.S. Doubts About Pakistan
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Did U.S. Know About N. Korea's Enrichment Plant?
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Private security contractors guard a part of a route as NATO supply trucks drive past in the province of Ghazni, southwest of Kabul. Intense negotiations continued between Afghan President Hamid Karzai and the international community over the Afghan government's deadline for ridding the nation of private security guards. Rahmatullah Naikzad/AP hide caption

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