The Bombardier Challenger 300 is one of the most popular midsize business jets in production. Canada-based Bombardier has boomed in the two decades since the North American Free Trade Agreement was signed. Todd Williamson/AP hide caption

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NAFTA Opened Continent For Some Canadian Companies

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Freshly caught catfish wriggle in large nets in Doddsville, Miss. Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

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Battle Of The Bottom Feeder: U.S., Vietnam In Catfish Fight

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A Norfolk Southern train pulls oil tank units on its way to the PBF Energy refinery in Delaware City, Del. As U.S. oil production outpaces its pipeline capacity, more and more companies are looking to the railways to transport crude oil. Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

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Trains Gain Steam In Race To Transport Crude Oil In The U.S.

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Police display some of the jewelry recovered from the 2008 robbery of Harry Winston jewelers in Paris. Thieves snatched loot estimated to be worth $105 million. Francois Guillot/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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For European Gangs, A Gem Of A Growth Industry: Jewel Heists

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Trade Gets Sluggish As The Shutdown Leaves Agencies Shortstaffed

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In May, a large piece of the General Motors Building in Manhattan was purchased by a Chinese real estate developer. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Asian Investors Find Hot Market In U.S. Properties

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UN Security Council Take Up Report On Chemical Weapons

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Why Do Chemical Weapons Evoke Such A Strong Reaction?

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President Obama says any military strike he makes against the Syrian government in retaliation for suspected chemical attacks would be limited. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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If It's Not Legal, Can A Strike On Syria Be Justified?

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U.S. Marines with 4th Force Reconnaissance Company slide off F470 Combat Rubber Raiding Crafts during training in Waimanalo, Hawaii. The French company Zodiac has been the U.S. military's choice for inflatable rubber rafts for roughly two decades. Now the company is making the rafts in the U.S. Lance Cpl. Reece E. Lodder/Marine Corps Base Hawaii hide caption

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French Maker Of Military Rafts Gets An American Identity

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Mideast Peace Talks On Again, But Roadblocks Remain

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Coup Or No Coup In Egypt? U.S. Still Hasn't Decided

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Farmer Richard Wilkins, a firm believer in genetically modified crops, examines the corn crop at his farm in Greenwood, Del. U.S. and EU officials begin talks Monday on an ambitious free-trade agreement. One stumbling block is agriculture. Unlike the U.S., the EU bans the cultivation of genetically modified crops. Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

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EU-U.S. Trade: A Tale Of Two Farms

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Aracelis Upia Montero works at the Alta Gracia garment factory in the Dominican Republic. She says she was desperately poor before she began working at the factory, which pays much higher than usual wages. "I'm now eligible for loans and credits from the bank because I earn a good salary," she says. Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

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Can This Dominican Factory Pay Good Wages And Make A Profit?

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Worker Charles Lee sorts through clothes at Mac Recycling near Baltimore. Textile recycling is a huge international business, and a small facility like Mac ships about 80 tons of clothes each week to buyers around the world. Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

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The Global Afterlife Of Your Donated Clothes

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