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Becoming An American: A Proud Canadian's Story

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Aircraft wreckage is seen at the Mehran Pakistani naval air base a day after militants attacked it. Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Attack On Pakistani Base Renews Nuclear Qualms

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Members of the Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment watch as a massive dust storm is just seconds away from enveloping Patrol Base Fires in Sangin District, Helmand province, southern Afghanistan. Roughly 100,000 service members are in Afghanistan, and their future there is being newly considered in Washington after the death of Osama bin Laden in Pakistan. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Bin Laden's Death Alters Debate Over Afghanistan

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Bahraini police fired tear gas to disperse protesters gathered at Pearl Square in Manama on March 13. The square was the epicenter of anti-government protests. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bahrain Crackdown Puts Pressure On U.S. Diplomacy

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Palestinian Factions Sign Agreement

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Hamas, Fatah Hopeful Reconciliation Deal Will Last

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The government of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, seen here during a Cabinet meeting on May 1, says it will withhold the transfer of $90 million in tax funds and customs fees for the Palestinian Authority. The move comes after news of a reconciliation deal between two key rival Palestinian factions. Baz Ratner/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Israel Balks At Palestinian Unity Deal

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Israeli left- and right-wing activists demonstrate in Tel Aviv on April 21, when prominent leftist Israeli intellectuals signed a petition in favor of creating a Palestinian state based on 1967 borders. Ariel Schalit/AP hide caption

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Fatah, Hamas Deal Could Affect Mideast Peace Process

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An Israeli man rides a tractor in the village of Majdal Shams in the Golan Heights, near the Israeli-Syrian border on June 1, 2007. Some worry that political unrest in Syria could threaten peace in the area. Sebastian Scheiner/AP hide caption

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Israel Takes Wait-And-See Approach To Syria Unrest

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Brandishing an image of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, forces celebrated after retaking the eastern Libyan oil town of Ras Lanuf on March 12 from rebel forces fighting to topple the regime. Mahmud Turkia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Oil A Major Prize In Fight For Control Of Libya

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Unrest In Syria Raises Alarm In Washington

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The USS Barry launches a Tomahawk missile, targeting radar and anti-aircraft sites along Libya's Mediterranean coast on Saturday. U.S. Navy/Getty Images hide caption

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Will U.S. Policy In Libya Spread To Other Nations?

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Children holding portraits of Moammar Gadhafi demonstrate outside the U.N. mission headquarters in Tripoli on Thursday. Libyan state-run television said that forces loyal to Gadhafi had wrested control of Misrata, one of the last rebel-held bastion, and were "purging" it of insurgents. Mahmud Turkia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Libya Shifts Momentum Of Arab World Protests

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Libyan Leader Moammar Gadhafi arrives at a hotel to give television interviews in Tripoli, Libya, on Tuesday. Ben Curtis/AP hide caption

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Tribes Regroup As Gadhafi's Control Is Threatened

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Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, shown in a 2008 file photo, has created an incredibly centralized state, with all decisions going through him, says Frederic Wehrey, a senior policy analyst at the RAND Corp. Sergei Grits/AP hide caption

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Who'll Fill Void If Gadhafi Falls? U.S. Wishes It Knew

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