In May, a large piece of the General Motors Building in Manhattan was purchased by a Chinese real estate developer. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Asian Investors Find Hot Market In U.S. Properties

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UN Security Council Take Up Report On Chemical Weapons

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Why Do Chemical Weapons Evoke Such A Strong Reaction?

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President Obama says any military strike he makes against the Syrian government in retaliation for suspected chemical attacks would be limited. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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If It's Not Legal, Can A Strike On Syria Be Justified?

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U.S. Marines with 4th Force Reconnaissance Company slide off F470 Combat Rubber Raiding Crafts during training in Waimanalo, Hawaii. The French company Zodiac has been the U.S. military's choice for inflatable rubber rafts for roughly two decades. Now the company is making the rafts in the U.S. Lance Cpl. Reece E. Lodder/Marine Corps Base Hawaii hide caption

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French Maker Of Military Rafts Gets An American Identity

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Mideast Peace Talks On Again, But Roadblocks Remain

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Coup Or No Coup In Egypt? U.S. Still Hasn't Decided

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Farmer Richard Wilkins, a firm believer in genetically modified crops, examines the corn crop at his farm in Greenwood, Del. U.S. and EU officials begin talks Monday on an ambitious free-trade agreement. One stumbling block is agriculture. Unlike the U.S., the EU bans the cultivation of genetically modified crops. Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

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EU-U.S. Trade: A Tale Of Two Farms

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Aracelis Upia Montero works at the Alta Gracia garment factory in the Dominican Republic. She says she was desperately poor before she began working at the factory, which pays much higher than usual wages. "I'm now eligible for loans and credits from the bank because I earn a good salary," she says. Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

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Can This Dominican Factory Pay Good Wages And Make A Profit?

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Worker Charles Lee sorts through clothes at Mac Recycling near Baltimore. Textile recycling is a huge international business, and a small facility like Mac ships about 80 tons of clothes each week to buyers around the world. Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

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The Global Afterlife Of Your Donated Clothes

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First U.S. Company To Enter Export Market For Natural Gas

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The Port of Baltimore recently completed a major expansion, which included building a 50-foot berth and dredging the channel. It's in anticipation of increased traffic following the completion of a project to widen the Panama Canal. Jonathan Blakely/NPR hide caption

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Port Of Baltimore Seeks Boost From Panama Canal Expansion

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Labor Watchdog Groups Limited In Their Power To Enforce Laws

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Margaret Thatcher became Britain's first female prime minister in 1979 and served until 1990. In 1992, she was elevated to the House of Lords to become Baroness Thatcher of Kesteven. Thatcher died Monday at age 87 following a stroke, her spokesman said. Harry Dempster/Express/Getty Images hide caption

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Britain's Iron Lady, Former Prime Minister Thatcher, Dies

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Eric Schmidt, Google's executive chairman and former CEO, stands near a statue of the late North Korean leader Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang in January. He's headed now to Myanmar, another largely untapped market. David Guttenfelder/AP hide caption

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Google's Eric Schmidt Heads To Another Isolated Asian Nation

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