Jackie Northam
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Jackie Northam

Correspondent, Foreign Affairs

Jackie Northam is Foreign Affairs correspondent for NPR news. The veteran journalist has more than two decades of experience covering the world's hot spots and reporting on a broad tapestry of international and foreign policy issues.

Based in Washington, D.C., Northam is assigned to the leading stories of the day, traveling regularly overseas to report the news - from Afghanistan and Pakistan, to earthquake-ravaged Haiti.

Northam just completed a five year stint as NPR's National Security Correspondent, covering US defense and intelligence policies. She led the network's coverage of the US military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, traveling regularly to the controversial base to report on conditions there, and on US efforts to prosecute detainees.

Northam spent more than a decade as a foreign correspondent. She reported from Beirut during the war between Hezbollah and Israel in 2006, from Iraq after the fall of Saddam Hussein, and from Saudi Arabia during the first Gulf War. She lived in and reported extensively from Southeast Asia, Indochina, and Eastern Europe, where she charted the fall of communism.

While based in Nairobi, Kenya, Northam covered the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. She managed to enter the country just days after the slaughter of ethnic Tutsis began by hitching a ride with a French priest who was helping Rwandans escape to neighboring Burundi.

A native of Canada, Northam's first overseas reporting post was London, where she spent seven years covering stories on Margaret Thatcher's Britain and efforts to create the European Union.

Northam has received multiple journalism awards during her career, including Associated Press awards, regional Edward R. Murrow awards, and was part of an NPR team journalists that won an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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People line up to buy groceries outside a supermarket in Caracas, Venezuela's capital, on July 13. The State Department issued a travel warning for the country on July 7. Four other countries have been the subject of U.S. travel warnings since July 1. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Often Issues Travel Warnings, But Lately The Tables Are Turned

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A U.S. Marine amphibious assault vehicle makes its way to shore after leaving an amphibious transport dock ship during a landing exercise on a beach at San Antonio in the Philippines' Zambales Province on April 21, 2015. The exercise was part of annual Philippine-U.S. joint maneuvers and took place some 137 miles east of the Scarborough Shoal in the South China Sea. Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Will Hague Tribunal's South China Sea Ruling Inflame U.S.-China Tensions?

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An Iran Air Boeing 747 is parked at Mehrabad International Airport in Tehran in this 2003 photo. Boeing has agreed to lease or sell about 100 aircraft to Iran, but there are still potential obstacles. Hasan Sarbakhshian/AP hide caption

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More Than Airplanes Are Riding On Boeing's Deal With Iran

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In Wake Of Brexit Vote, U.S. Loses Influence In The EU

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British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond (left) and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry hold a joint press conference after meeting in London on Monday. The U.S. "could not ask for a better friend and ally," Kerry said. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Chicago-based aircraft manufacturer Boeing would not divulge details about its deal with Iran Air — not the number of aircraft involved, the specific models or the price tag. Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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U.S.-Russia Relations Are Frosty But They're Toasty On The Arctic Council

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Father Of Orlando Gunman Saddened By Nightclub Massacre

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After Nuclear Deal, Iran Pulls Quick Oil Production Rebound

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A farmer handles a bag of Syngenta's bean seeds on a farm near Johannesburg, South Africa. Waldo Swiegers/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Lawmakers Scrutinize China's Bid To Buy Agrichemical Giant Syngenta

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Vietnamese navy officers (in white) talk with U.S. sailors aboard the guided missile destroyer USS Chafee in the central Vietnamese city of Danang in 2012. The two countries have increased military cooperation in recent years and President Obama announced Monday that he was lifting the ban on weapons sales to Vietnam. Hoang Dinh Nam/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Now That Vietnam Can Buy U.S. Weapons, What Will It Want?

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The Chinese company Fuling Plastic set up a plant in Allentown, Pa., last year. The company, which makes straws and other plastic products, supplies fast food chains. Chinese companies are expected to invest about $30 billion in the U.S. this year, doubling the record set last year. Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

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China Ramps Up U.S. Investments, From Straws To Semiconductors

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