Jackie Northam
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Jackie Northam

Correspondent, Foreign Affairs

Jackie Northam is Foreign Affairs correspondent for NPR news. The veteran journalist has more than two decades of experience covering the world's hot spots and reporting on a broad tapestry of international and foreign policy issues.

Based in Washington, D.C., Northam is assigned to the leading stories of the day, traveling regularly overseas to report the news - from Afghanistan and Pakistan, to earthquake-ravaged Haiti.

Northam just completed a five year stint as NPR's National Security Correspondent, covering US defense and intelligence policies. She led the network's coverage of the US military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, traveling regularly to the controversial base to report on conditions there, and on US efforts to prosecute detainees.

Northam spent more than a decade as a foreign correspondent. She reported from Beirut during the war between Hezbollah and Israel in 2006, from Iraq after the fall of Saddam Hussein, and from Saudi Arabia during the first Gulf War. She lived in and reported extensively from Southeast Asia, Indochina, and Eastern Europe, where she charted the fall of communism.

While based in Nairobi, Kenya, Northam covered the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. She managed to enter the country just days after the slaughter of ethnic Tutsis began by hitching a ride with a French priest who was helping Rwandans escape to neighboring Burundi.

A native of Canada, Northam's first overseas reporting post was London, where she spent seven years covering stories on Margaret Thatcher's Britain and efforts to create the European Union.

Northam has received multiple journalism awards during her career, including Associated Press awards, regional Edward R. Murrow awards, and was part of an NPR team journalists that won an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Family members of Shafqat Hussain, who was convicted and hanged in Pakistan in August for killing a boy in 2004, waited to receive his body outside the central jail in Karachi. Pakistan executed more than 300 people last year. Fareed Khan/AP hide caption

toggle caption Fareed Khan/AP

Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau welcomed Syrian refugees arriving from Beirut at the Toronto airport last week. Mark Blinch/Reuters /Landov hide caption

toggle caption Mark Blinch/Reuters /Landov

Cars drive past a banner of Saudi Arabia's King Salman that reads, "Salman, we hear and obey," near Mecca on Sept. 17. A drop in oil revenue is forcing Saudi Arabia to consider cuts to social programs. The Saudis have declined to cut production, a move that would likely drive up prices, but could also cost the country its current share of the world oil market. Mosa'ab Elshamy/AP hide caption

toggle caption Mosa'ab Elshamy/AP

Canada has pledged to accept 25,000 Syrian refugees, likely including women, children and injured people who have been living in camps in Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan. Here, children stand outside their tents during a sandstorm, in a refugee camp in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley in September. Bilal Hussein/AP hide caption

toggle caption Bilal Hussein/AP

A member of the Syrian government forces stands next to a well at Jazel oil field, near the ancient city of Palmyra, after they retook the area from the Islamic State in March. U.S.-led airstrikes have targeted oil facilities run by ISIS, which, according to some estimates, earns as much as $1 million per day from oil sales. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption STR/AFP/Getty Images

Parallels

Hitting ISIS Where It Hurts By Striking Oil Trucks

Illicit oil sales generate large revenues every day for the Islamic State. The U.S. airstrikes could dry up a significant stream of cash for the group.

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