Pythons' huge meals strengthen their hearts, and scientists hope it will help them learn how to treat human heart diseases.

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Eating Your Way To A Healthy Heart (If You're A Python)

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Adrian Beltre of the Texas Rangers is hit by a pitch from the Tampa Bay Rays' James Shields on Oct. 1 at Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, Texas.

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Pain At The Plate: Heat Increases Pitcher Retaliation

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Nature

Researchers Advance Cloning Of Human Embryos

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Israeli Wins Nobel Chemistry Prize For Quasicrystals

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The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, known as SOFIA, is a modified Boeing 747 airplane that houses a NASA telescope. Melissa Forsyth/NPR hide caption

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Flying Telescope Makes An Out-Of-This-World Find

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NASA's GRAIL mission to study the moon launches aboard a Delta II rocket at Kennedy Space Center on Sept. 10. Sandra Joseph and Don Kight/NASA hide caption

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Launch Logistics: Speedy Rocket, Slow Electronics

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A Swainson's thrush flies a mock-migration in the wind tunnel at the University of Western Ontario. Science/AAAS hide caption

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Thirsty Birds 'Burn The Engine' In Flight

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Does getting home from your vacation spot always seem to take less time than getting there? A new scientific study provides an explanation for why. Harold M. Lambert/Lambert/Getty Images hide caption

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Why The Trip Home Seems To Go By Faster

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A Remnant From Algae In Malaria Parasite May Prove Its Weakness

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Researchers hope to keep the mosquito that transmits dengue, Aedes aegypti, from infecting humans using the Wolbachia bacterium. James Gathany/CDC Public Health Image Library hide caption

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Better You Than Me: Scientists Sicken Mosquitoes To Stop Dengue

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Don't Throw It Out: 'Junk DNA' Essential In Evolution

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Scientists now know why coffee rings have dark, well-defined edges, as seen in the image above. The research finding may have implications on the development of inks and paints. Marina Dominguez/NPR hide caption

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Scientists Crack The Physics Of Coffee Rings

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'Labs On A Chip' May Detect Diseases In The Field

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