Researchers say they have identified traces of ice in craters on Mercury, seen here in this Oct. 8, 2008, image from the Messenger spacecraft. NASA hide caption

toggle caption NASA
Space Probe Finds Ice In Mercury's Craters
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/166162020/166186740" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

NASA's Mars rover Curiosity dug up five scoops of sand from a patch nicknamed "Rocknest." A suite of instruments called SAM analyzed Martian soil samples, but the findings have not yet been released. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

toggle caption NASA/JPL-Caltech
Big News From Mars? Rover Scientists Mum For Now
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/165513016/165545214" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A man crosses a flooded street in the wake of Superstorm Sandy on Thursday in Little Ferry, N.J. Surprise coastal surge floods caused by the storm battered Little Ferry, Moonachie and some other towns along the Hackensack River in Bergen County, all areas unaccustomed to flooding. Mike Groll/AP hide caption

toggle caption Mike Groll/AP
Levee Rebuilding Questioned After Sandy Breach
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/164193857/164274642" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An emergency responder helps residents of Little Ferry, N.J., after their neighborhood was flooded due to Superstorm Sandy. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Andrew Burton/Getty Images
In Flooded New Jersey, No Oversight For Levees
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/164101955/164126733" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
'Frankenstorm' Sandy Churns Toward East Coast
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/163896121/163896096" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Urushiol, the chemical in poison ivy, is also harvested from the Japanese lacquer tree to coat lacquerware. Here, a rash caused by lacquerware that likely was not properly cured. Kenji Kabashima hide caption

toggle caption Kenji Kabashima
Spray Lights Up The Chemical That Causes Poison Ivy Rash
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/162789103/162921967" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Álvaro Marín
Fun With Physics: How To Make Tiny Medicine Nanoballs
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/162600868/162618894" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

One martini; shaken, not stirred. Karen Castillo Farfan/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Karen Castillo Farfan/NPR
Shake It Up, Baby: Are Martinis Made The Bond Way Better?
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/162305178/162347403" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A mural in an ancient tomb in China shows a troupe of eunuchs. How long did they live? Wikimedia Commons hide caption

toggle caption Wikimedia Commons

The genetic factors responsible for a cat's stripes might help researchers understand disease resistance in humans. kennymatic via Flickr hide caption

toggle caption kennymatic via Flickr
Could Genes For Stripes Help Kitty Fight Disease?
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/161484592/161502076" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A health worker in the Domincan Republic sprays insecticide between houses to stop dengue fever outbreaks this month. Erika Santelices/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Erika Santelices/AFP/Getty Images

A male Solenosteira macrospira, left, carries snail eggs on its shell. But not all of the eggs were fertilized by him. Females, like the one on the right, deposit the eggs into papery capsules and attach them to the males' shells. P.B. Marko/Ecology Letters hide caption

toggle caption P.B. Marko/Ecology Letters
Who's Your Daddy?: Male Snail Carries Eggs As Cargo
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/160627329/160654757" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Catherine Wong used electrical components to build an electrocardiogram that sends data by cellphone. Courtesy of Catherine Wong hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Catherine Wong