NASA Uses Photo Of Earth From Saturn To Boost Space Interest
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Wood fibers are coated with carbon nanotubes and then packed into small disks of metal. The sodium ions moving around in the wood fibers create an electric current. Heather Rousseau/NPR hide caption

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All Charged Up: Engineers Create A Battery Made Of Wood
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Before And After: These near-infrared images of Uranus show the planet as seen without adaptive optics (left) and with the technology turned on (right). Courtesy of Heidi B. Hammel and Imke de Pater hide caption

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For Sharpest Views, Scope The Sky With Quick-Change Mirrors
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Scientists Discover Rip Van Winkle Of The Plant World
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The small patch in the middle of the image is Aulacomnium turgidum, a type of bryophyte plant. Researchers in the Canadian Arctic say they are surprised the bryophytes were still green, even after being covered by ice. Courtesy of Caroline La Farge hide caption

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From the May 29, 2013, 'Morning Edition': NPR's Joe Palca reports on the discovery
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Researchers use the 120-foot tower atop Mauna Loa in Hawaii to collect air samples and measure the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Mauna Kea looms in the distance. Forrest M. Mims III/forrestmims.org hide caption

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Atop A Hawaiian Mountain, A Constant Sniff For Carbon Dioxide
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AnthroTronix Founder and CEO Corinna Lathan, at the company's offices in Silver Spring, Md. Courtesy of AnthroTronix, Inc. hide caption

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Envisioning The Future With Inventor Cori Lathan
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The small squares superimposed on this image of the Milky Way galaxy show where in the sky the Kepler telescope is hunting for Earth-like planets. Kepler, which launched in 2009, has identified more than 100 planets. NASA hide caption

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Kepler Telescope Spots 3 New Planets In The 'Goldilocks Zone'
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Jonathan Wilker holds up a group of oysters from a tank in his lab at Purdue University. Rebecca Davis/NPR hide caption

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Why A Hoosier State Scientist Is Stuck On Oysters
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This image represents a chunk, or "cube," of brain. Each different color represents a different neuron, and the goal of the EyeWire game is to figure out how these tangled neurons connect to each other. Players look at a slice from this cube and try to identify the boundaries of each cell. It isn't easy, and it takes practice. You can try it for yourself at eyewire.org. EyeWire hide caption

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Wanna Play? Computer Gamers Help Push Frontier Of Brain Research
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