A mural in an ancient tomb in China shows a troupe of eunuchs. How long did they live? Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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The genetic factors responsible for a cat's stripes might help researchers understand disease resistance in humans. kennymatic via Flickr hide caption

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Could Genes For Stripes Help Kitty Fight Disease?

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A health worker in the Domincan Republic sprays insecticide between houses to stop dengue fever outbreaks this month. Erika Santelices/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A male Solenosteira macrospira, left, carries snail eggs on its shell. But not all of the eggs were fertilized by him. Females, like the one on the right, deposit the eggs into papery capsules and attach them to the males' shells. P.B. Marko/Ecology Letters hide caption

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Who's Your Daddy?: Male Snail Carries Eggs As Cargo

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Catherine Wong used electrical components to build an electrocardiogram that sends data by cellphone. Courtesy of Catherine Wong hide caption

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A replica of the pinky bone fragment found in a Siberian cave. Researchers used the bone bit to extract and sequence the genome of a girl who lived tens of thousands of years ago. Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology hide caption

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Pinky DNA Points To Clues About Ancient Humans

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Roger Angel, an astronomer at the University of Arizona, stands in front of his new project: a solar tracker. Angel wants to use the device to harness Arizona's abundant sunlight and turn it into usable energy. Jason Millstein for NPR hide caption

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Telescope Innovator Shines His Genius On New Fields

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In this photo released by SkyandTelescope.com, a Perseid meteor flashes across the constellation Andromeda on Aug. 12, 1997. Rick Scott and Joe Orman/AP hide caption

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Summer Science: What's A Meteor Shower?

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Adam Steltzner, the leader of the rover's entry, descent and landing engineering team, cheers after Curiosity touched down safely on Mars on Sunday. Bill Ingalls/NASA/Getty Images hide caption

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So You Landed On Mars. Now What?

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Curiosity Is On Mars, Now What?

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NASA's Curiosity Lands On Red Planet

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An artist's concept of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft depicts the final minute before the rover, Curiosity, touches down on the surface of Mars. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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Waiting For A Sign: Mars Rover To Land On Its Own

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Anxiety Hovers Over Rover's Mars Landing

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