Sylvia Poggioli 2011
Kainaz Amaria/NPR
Sylvia Poggioli 2011
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Sylvia Poggioli

Senior European Correspondent, Rome, Italy

Sylvia Poggioli is senior European correspondent for NPR's international desk covering political, economic, and cultural news in Italy, the Vatican, Western Europe and the Balkans. Poggioli's on-air reporting and analysis have encompassed the fall of communism in Eastern Europe, the turbulent civil war in the former Yugoslavia and how immigration has transformed European societies.

Since joining NPR's foreign desk in 1982, Poggioli has traveled extensively for reporting assignments. Most recently, she travelled to Norway to cover the aftermath of the brutal attacks by an ultra-rightwing extremist; to Greece, Spain, and Portugal for the latest on the euro-zone crisis; and the Balkans where the last wanted war criminals have been arrested.

In addition, Poggioli has traveled to France, Germany, United Kingdom, The Netherlands, Belgium, Austria, Sweden, and Denmark to produce in-depth reports on immigration, racism, Islam, and the rise of the right in Europe.

Throughout her career Poggioli has been recognized for her work with distinctions including: the WBUR Foreign Correspondent Award, the Welles Hangen Award for Distinguished Journalism, a George Foster Peabody and National Women's Political Caucus/Radcliffe College Exceptional Merit Media Awards, the Edward Weintal Journalism Prize, and the Silver Angel Excellence in the Media Award. Poggioli was part of the NPR team that won the 2000 Overseas Press Club Award for coverage of the war in Kosovo. In 2009, she received the Maria Grazia Cutulli Award for foreign reporting.

In 2000, Poggioli received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from Brandeis University. In 2006, she received an honorary degree from the University of Massachusetts at Boston together with Barack Obama.

Prior to this honor, Poggioli was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences "for her distinctive, cultivated and authoritative reports on 'ethnic cleansing' in Bosnia." In 1990, Poggioli spent an academic year at Harvard University as a research fellow at Harvard University's Center for Press, Politics, and Public Policy at the Kennedy School of Government.

From 1971 to 1986, Poggioli served as an editor on the English-language desk for the Ansa News Agency in Italy. She worked at the Festival of Two Worlds in Spoleto, Italy. She was actively involved with women's film and theater groups.

The daughter of Italian anti-fascists who were forced to flee Italy under Mussolini, Poggioli was born in Providence, Rhode Island, and grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She graduated from Harvard College with a Bachelor's degree in Romance languages and literature. She later studied in Italy under a Fulbright Scholarship.

[+] read more[-] less

Sylvia Poggioli holds her hard-earned new Italian driver's license. After intense cramming, she aced the exam. The total cost for driving school, exam and license fees came to nearly $700. Courtesy of Sylvia Poggioli/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Sylvia Poggioli/NPR

Letter From Rome: The Hardest Exam Is The Driving Test

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/484161437/484215947" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pope Francis Speaks Of 'Genocide' In Armenia Visit

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/483426396/483426399" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pope Francis (center), flanked by the head of Armenia's Orthodox Church Karekin II (seventh left) and Catholicos Aram I (sixth right), celebrated an Armenian-Rite Mass in St. Peter's Basilica in April 2015. Pope Francis called the slaughter of Armenians by Ottoman Turks "the first genocide of the 20th century," sparking a diplomatic rift with Turkey. L'Osservatore Romano/AP hide caption

toggle caption L'Osservatore Romano/AP

Rome Elects Youngest, First-Ever Female Mayor

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/482832755/482832756" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Flight deck crew members position F/A-18 jet fighters for a launch from the USS Truman aircraft carrier stationed in the eastern Mediterranean. The crew members wear different colored jerseys to identify their tasks. Sylvia Poggioli/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Sylvia Poggioli/NPR

Even As It Heads Home, Aircraft Carrier Plays Key Role Fighting ISIS

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/482146050/482521451" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pope Francis hugs Sister Carmen Sammut, a missionary sister of Our Lady of Africa, at the Vatican on May 12. The pope said he was willing to create a commission to study whether women can be deacons in the Catholic Church, signaling an openness to letting women serve in ordained ministry currently reserved to men. AP hide caption

toggle caption AP

Seizing On Pope's Remarks, Women Meet In Rome To Discuss Female Priesthood

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/480624491/480731400" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Italy Pushes For Greater EU Cooperation In Combating Terrorism

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/480487273/480487274" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Surge Of Migrants Cross Mediterranean Sea From North Africa

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/480051302/480051303" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

3 Shipwrecks In 3 Days: 700 People Die Trying To Cross Mediterranean

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/479995864/479995865" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Chinese police officer poses with Chinese tourists in front of Milan's cathedral on May 3. Chinese police are on patrol with Italian officers to help make Chinese visitors feel safer. Antonio Calanni/AP hide caption

toggle caption Antonio Calanni/AP

Chinese Cops In Italy? Joint Patrols Aim To Ease Chinese Tourists' Jitters

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/477630160/477693565" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Italians Concerned By Austria's Plan To Add Border Controls

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475551905/475551906" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

How Will The Pope's Invitation To Refugees Impact The Migrant Crisis?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474569111/474569112" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pope Francis Meets Migrants In Lesbos, Returns To Rome With 12 On His Plane

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474522382/474522383" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pope Francis To Show Solidarity With Migrants In Lesbos Visit

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474411502/474411505" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript