Kainaz Amaria/NPR
Sylvia Poggioli 2011
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Sylvia Poggioli

Senior European Correspondent, Rome, Italy

Sylvia Poggioli is senior European correspondent for NPR's international desk covering political, economic, and cultural news in Italy, the Vatican, Western Europe and the Balkans. Poggioli's on-air reporting and analysis have encompassed the fall of communism in Eastern Europe, the turbulent civil war in the former Yugoslavia and how immigration has transformed European societies.

Since joining NPR's foreign desk in 1982, Poggioli has traveled extensively for reporting assignments. Most recently, she travelled to Norway to cover the aftermath of the brutal attacks by an ultra-rightwing extremist; to Greece, Spain, and Portugal for the latest on the euro-zone crisis; and the Balkans where the last wanted war criminals have been arrested.

In addition, Poggioli has traveled to France, Germany, United Kingdom, The Netherlands, Belgium, Austria, Sweden, and Denmark to produce in-depth reports on immigration, racism, Islam, and the rise of the right in Europe.

Throughout her career Poggioli has been recognized for her work with distinctions including: the WBUR Foreign Correspondent Award, the Welles Hangen Award for Distinguished Journalism, a George Foster Peabody and National Women's Political Caucus/Radcliffe College Exceptional Merit Media Awards, the Edward Weintal Journalism Prize, and the Silver Angel Excellence in the Media Award. Poggioli was part of the NPR team that won the 2000 Overseas Press Club Award for coverage of the war in Kosovo. In 2009, she received the Maria Grazia Cutulli Award for foreign reporting.

In 2000, Poggioli received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from Brandeis University. In 2006, she received an honorary degree from the University of Massachusetts at Boston together with Barack Obama.

Prior to this honor, Poggioli was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences "for her distinctive, cultivated and authoritative reports on 'ethnic cleansing' in Bosnia." In 1990, Poggioli spent an academic year at Harvard University as a research fellow at Harvard University's Center for Press, Politics, and Public Policy at the Kennedy School of Government.

From 1971 to 1986, Poggioli served as an editor on the English-language desk for the Ansa News Agency in Italy. She worked at the Festival of Two Worlds in Spoleto, Italy. She was actively involved with women's film and theater groups.

The daughter of Italian anti-fascists who were forced to flee Italy under Mussolini, Poggioli was born in Providence, Rhode Island, and grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She graduated from Harvard College with a Bachelor's degree in Romance languages and literature. She later studied in Italy under a Fulbright Scholarship.

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As Italy Weighs National Referendum, Get Ready To Hear The Word 'Italexit'

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Italians To Vote On Referendum To Overhaul The Nation's Constitution

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A family disembarks from the Topaz Responder, a rescue ship, Oct. 27 at Brindisi in southern Italy. The ship arrived with 347 migrants and refugees from Central Africa and Syria following a rescue operation off the Libyan coast. Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images

Italy Becomes A Leading Destination For Migrants, Matching Greece

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Italy On Track To Receive Record Number Of Migrants This Year

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Pope Francis Commemorates 500th Anniversary Of Protestant Reformation

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Pope Francis speaks to Lutheran pilgrims at the Vatican on Oct. 13. The pope is traveling to Lund, Sweden — where the Lutheran World Federation was founded 70 years ago — on Monday to take part in the yearlong commemoration of the Protestant Reformation, launched by Martin Luther in 1517. AP hide caption

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AP

The Pope Commemorates The Reformation That Split Western Christianity

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Italians Decry Rome's Invasion Of McDonald's And Cheap Souvenir Shops

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Kosovo's Government Cracks Down On Extremist Recruiting

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People walk past a replica of an ancient statue of a human-headed winged bull from Nimrud, Iraq, destroyed by the Islamic State. It's part of an exhibition called "Rising from Destruction" at Rome's Colosseum. Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images

Replicas Of Artifacts Destroyed By ISIS 'Rising From Destruction' In Rome

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Sylvia Poggioli holds her hard-earned new Italian driver's license. After intense cramming, she aced the exam. The total cost for driving school, exam and license fees came to nearly $700. Courtesy of Sylvia Poggioli/NPR hide caption

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Courtesy of Sylvia Poggioli/NPR

Letter From Rome: The Hardest Exam Is The Driving Test

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Pope Francis Speaks Of 'Genocide' In Armenia Visit

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Pope Francis (center), flanked by the head of Armenia's Orthodox Church Karekin II (seventh left) and Catholicos Aram I (sixth right), celebrated an Armenian-Rite Mass in St. Peter's Basilica in April 2015. Pope Francis called the slaughter of Armenians by Ottoman Turks "the first genocide of the 20th century," sparking a diplomatic rift with Turkey. L'Osservatore Romano/AP hide caption

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L'Osservatore Romano/AP

Rome Elects Youngest, First-Ever Female Mayor

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