Kainaz Amaria/NPR
Sylvia Poggioli 2011
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Sylvia Poggioli

Senior European Correspondent, Rome, Italy

Sylvia Poggioli is senior European correspondent for NPR's international desk covering political, economic, and cultural news in Italy, the Vatican, Western Europe and the Balkans. Poggioli's on-air reporting and analysis have encompassed the fall of communism in Eastern Europe, the turbulent civil war in the former Yugoslavia and how immigration has transformed European societies.

Since joining NPR's foreign desk in 1982, Poggioli has traveled extensively for reporting assignments. Most recently, she travelled to Norway to cover the aftermath of the brutal attacks by an ultra-rightwing extremist; to Greece, Spain, and Portugal for the latest on the euro-zone crisis; and the Balkans where the last wanted war criminals have been arrested.

In addition, Poggioli has traveled to France, Germany, United Kingdom, The Netherlands, Belgium, Austria, Sweden, and Denmark to produce in-depth reports on immigration, racism, Islam, and the rise of the right in Europe.

Throughout her career Poggioli has been recognized for her work with distinctions including: the WBUR Foreign Correspondent Award, the Welles Hangen Award for Distinguished Journalism, a George Foster Peabody and National Women's Political Caucus/Radcliffe College Exceptional Merit Media Awards, the Edward Weintal Journalism Prize, and the Silver Angel Excellence in the Media Award. Poggioli was part of the NPR team that won the 2000 Overseas Press Club Award for coverage of the war in Kosovo. In 2009, she received the Maria Grazia Cutulli Award for foreign reporting.

In 2000, Poggioli received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from Brandeis University. In 2006, she received an honorary degree from the University of Massachusetts at Boston together with Barack Obama.

Prior to this honor, Poggioli was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences "for her distinctive, cultivated and authoritative reports on 'ethnic cleansing' in Bosnia." In 1990, Poggioli spent an academic year at Harvard University as a research fellow at Harvard University's Center for Press, Politics, and Public Policy at the Kennedy School of Government.

From 1971 to 1986, Poggioli served as an editor on the English-language desk for the Ansa News Agency in Italy. She worked at the Festival of Two Worlds in Spoleto, Italy. She was actively involved with women's film and theater groups.

The daughter of Italian anti-fascists who were forced to flee Italy under Mussolini, Poggioli was born in Providence, Rhode Island, and grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She graduated from Harvard College with a Bachelor's degree in Romance languages and literature. She later studied in Italy under a Fulbright Scholarship.

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Pope Holds Mass In Cairo

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In Egypt, Pope Francis Gives Support To Coptic Christians After Attacks

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Pope Francis Heads To Egypt

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Anti-Pope Francis posters appeared in Rome last week, with a message in a Roman street dialect saying, "Hey, Frank, you took over Congregations, suspended priests, decapitated the Order of Malta and the Franciscans of The Immaculate, ignored Cardinals... Where the heck is your mercy?" Sylvia Poggioli /NPR hide caption

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Sylvia Poggioli /NPR

Steve Bannon Aligns With Vatican Hard-Liners Who Oppose Pope Francis

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The police force for protection of Italy's cultural heritage is headquartered in Rome's Piazza Sant'Ignazio. Sylvia Poggioli/NPR hide caption

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Sylvia Poggioli/NPR

For Italy's Art Police, An Ongoing Fight Against Pillage Of Priceless Works

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Migrants pray in a tent city in Rome, on Aug. 1. The migrants are mostly from Somalia, Eritrea and Sudan. In 2016, more migrants arrived in Italy than in Greece, which was the top destination a year earlier. Most of those reaching Italy are from sub-Saharan Africa rather than the Middle East. Stefano Montesi/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefano Montesi/Corbis via Getty Images

Italy Surpasses Greece As Top Euro Destination For Asylum Seekers

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Pope Francis' Causes Take On Greater Urgency

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Pope Francis listens to a children's band during his weekly general audience in Paul VI Hall at the Vatican on Dec. 21. L'Osservatore Romano/Pool Photo via AP hide caption

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L'Osservatore Romano/Pool Photo via AP

For Pope Francis, A Year Of Reconciliation Abroad Amid Opposition At Home

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Suspect In Berlin Christmas Market Attack Killed By Italian Police

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Berlin Attack Suspect Killed In Milan, Italian Police Say

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A visitor takes a photo of Judith Slaying Holofernes by Italian 17th century artist Artemisia Gentileschi, on display at Rome's Palazzo Braschi museum. The "Artemisia Gentileschi and Her Times" exhibition will run till May 7, 2017. Andrew Medichini/AP hide caption

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Andrew Medichini/AP

Long Seen As Victim, 17th Century Italian Painter Emerges As Feminist Icon

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Kosovo War Crimes Court Established In The Hague

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Italian Prime Minister Resigns After Voters Reject Constitutional Reform

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Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi announced Sunday night he would resign, after voters rejected the referendum on constitutional reforms. Opposition parties had framed the vote as a referendum on Renzi himself. Franco Origlia/Getty Images hide caption

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Franco Origlia/Getty Images

In European Votes, Italy's Prime Minister To Step Down; Austria Elects Leftist

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