Philip Reeves 2016 i
NPR
Philip Reeves 2016
NPR

Philip Reeves

International Correspondent, Islamabad, Pakistan

Philip Reeves is an award-winning international correspondent covering Pakistan and Afghanistan.

Reeves has spent two and half decades working as a journalist overseas, reporting from a wide range of places including the former Soviet Union, the Middle East and Asia.

He is a member of the NPR team that won highly prestigious Alfred I. duPont–Columbia University and George Foster Peabody awards for coverage of the conflict in Iraq. Reeves has been honored several times by the South Asian Journalists' Association.

Reeves has been covering South Asia for more than 10 years. He has traveled widely in Pakistan and India, taking NPR listeners on voyages along the Ganges River and the ancient Grand Trunk Road.

Reeves joined NPR in 2004, after 17 years as a international correspondent for the British daily newspaper, The Independent. During the early stages of his career, he worked for BBC radio and television after training on the Bath Chronicle newspaper in western Britain.

Over the years, Reeves has covered a wide range of stories - from Boris Yeltsin's erratic presidency, the economic rise of India, the rise and fall of Pakistan's General Pervez Musharraf, conflicts in Gaza and the West Bank, Chechnya, Iraq, Afghanistan and Sri Lanka.

Reeves holds a degree in English Literature from Cambridge University. His family originates from Christchurch, New Zealand.

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In A Remote Fishing Town, Young Pakistanis Question Plan To Build Trade Route
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Zabihuillah Niazi, a 25-year-old nurse, lost an eye and an arm when an American AC-130 gunship shelled the Medecins Sans Frontieres trauma center in Kunduz, Afghanistan, in October 2015, killing 42 people. Zabihullah Tamanna for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Zabihullah Tamanna for NPR
At Least 28 People Killed In Kabul Attack
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Taliban Claims Responsibility For Explosion In Afghan Capital Kabul
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Survivors Of Afghan Hospital Airstrike Dissatisfied With Compensation Plan
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Prominent Young Afghans Press For Change Through Intellectual Soldiering
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Pakistani religious protesters march in the capital Islamabad on Wednesday, where tens of thousands demonstrated this past week. Their demands included government assurances that the country's strict blasphemy laws would not be eased. The protesters agreed to leave after saying they had received such promises. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Pakistani Government Shuts Off Mobile Phone Network Amid Massive Protest
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Grief And Fury Roil Lahore, Pakistan, One Day After Deadly Blast
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Group Claims Responsibility For Pakistan Attack; Targeted Christians
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Afghans seeking passports wait in line in Kabul on Jan. 20. Many Afghans are seeking to leave the country, though some have returned from countries like Germany after finding out that they were unlikely to receive asylum. Xinhua News Agency hide caption

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Feeling Unwanted In Germany, Some Afghan Migrants Head Home
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