Philip Reeves

International Correspondent, Islamabad, Pakistan

Philip Reeves is an award-winning international correspondent covering Pakistan and Afghanistan.

Reeves has spent two and half decades working as a journalist overseas, reporting from a wide range of places including the former Soviet Union, the Middle East and Asia.

He is a member of the NPR team that won highly prestigious Alfred I. duPont–Columbia University and George Foster Peabody awards for coverage of the conflict in Iraq. Reeves has been honored several times by the South Asian Journalists' Association.

Reeves has been covering South Asia for more than 10 years. He has traveled widely in Pakistan and India, taking NPR listeners on voyages along the Ganges River and the ancient Grand Trunk Road.

Reeves joined NPR in 2004, after 17 years as a international correspondent for the British daily newspaper, The Independent. During the early stages of his career, he worked for BBC radio and television after training on the Bath Chronicle newspaper in western Britain.

Over the years, Reeves has covered a wide range of stories - from Boris Yeltsin's erratic presidency, the economic rise of India, the rise and fall of Pakistan's General Pervez Musharraf, conflicts in Gaza and the West Bank, Chechnya, Iraq, Afghanistan and Sri Lanka.

Reeves holds a degree in English Literature from Cambridge University. His family originates from Christchurch, New Zealand.

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People enjoy an informal parade before carnival in Rio's Zona Central. Philip Reeves/NPR hide caption

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Rio's Carnival Is A Glitter-Filled Euphoria, Even If Brazil's Government Is Not

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Brazilians Prepare For Carnival, And Its Grueling Test Of Physical Endurance

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Brazilian State Suffers Through Days Of Violence During Police Strike

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Eike Batista Memes Fuel Humor In Brazil After Billionaire's Imprisonment

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Former Commodities Tycoon Jailed In Brazil As Part Of Corruption Probe

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Brazilian Soccer Team Returns To The Field After Deadly Airplane Crash

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Brazil's Supreme Court Justice Teori Zavascki, pictured here in 2015, has died in a plane crash. He had been investigating corruption allegations against Brazilian politicians and business executives. Eraldo Peres/AP hide caption

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Eraldo Peres/AP

Something's Fishy At Manaus Airport In Brazil

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Riot Prompts Questions: Is Brazil In Control Of Its Prisons?

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How To Make New Friends In Rio: 'Go And Sit On The Little Wall'

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If Only For New Year's Eve, Brazilians Wave Bad Luck Goodbye

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With 2016 About To End, Brazilians Look Forward To A Better Year

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After 27 Hours, Our Train Ride Through Pakistan Ends In Karachi

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Some of the men imprisoned by a criminal gang in Pakistan's illicit kidney trade return to the apartment in Rawalpindi where they were held by force. Philip Reeves/NPR hide caption

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In Pakistan, Illegal Kidney Trade Flourishes As Victims Await Justice

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