Phillip Reeves
Loren Jenkins/N/A

Philip Reeves

International Correspondent, Islamabad, Pakistan

Philip Reeves is an award-winning veteran international correspondent based in Islamabad, Pakistan. Previous to his current role, he covered Europe out of NPR's bureau in London.

Reeves has spent two decades working as a journalist overseas, reporting from a wide range of places including the former Soviet Union, the Middle East and Asia.

A member of the NPR team that won highly prestigious Alfred I. duPont–Columbia University and George Foster Peabody awards for coverage of the conflict in Iraq, Reeves has been honored several times by the South Asian Journalists Association.

In 2010, Reeves moved to London from New Delhi after a stint of more than seven years working in and around South Asia. He traveled widely in India, taking listeners on voyages along the Ganges River and the ancient Grand Trunk Road. He also made numerous trips to cover unrest and political turmoil in Pakistan.

Reeves joined NPR in 2004, after spending 17 years as a correspondent for the British daily newspaper, The Independent. During the early stages of his career, he worked for BBC radio and television after training on the Bath Chronicle newspaper in western Britain.

Over the years, Reeves has covered a wide range of stories - from the Waco siege, to the growth of the Internet, Boris Yeltsin's erratic presidency, the economic rise of India, and conflicts in Gaza and the West Bank, Chechnya, Iraq, Afghanistan and Sri Lanka.

Graduating from Cambridge University, Reeves earned a degree in English literature. He and his wife have one daughter. His family originates from New Zealand.

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Pakistani women queue to cast their ballots last month at a polling station during local government elections in Lahore, one of the country's biggest cities. In other areas, local tradition can prevent women from voting. JAMIL AHMED/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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As worries grow over unemployment and lack of security, many Afghans are trying to go elsewhere. An Afghan National Police officer calls out the names of passport applicants at the passport office in Kabul in August. SHAH MARAI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anxiety Grows As Conditions Worsen In Afghanistan

High unemployment, a weak central government and recent Taliban gains are creating a growing apprehension on the streets of the capital, Kabul.

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A Gwadar fisherman relaxes as the sun goes down. Abdul Sattar for NPR hide caption

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Two men stand near the port in Gwadar, Pakistan. NPR's Phil Reeves unexpectedly ended up a VIP there — and it wasn't a good feeling. Phil Reeves/NPR hide caption

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A Pakistani buyer carries goats in a vehicle on the outskirts of Islamabad for Eid al-Adha, the Muslim holiday of sacrifice. The meat from livestock sacrificed on Eid al-Adha is shared with the poor. B.K. Bangash/AP hide caption

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