Claudio Sanchez 2010 i
Doby Photography/NPR
Claudio Sanchez 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Claudio Sanchez

Correspondent, Education, National Desk

Former elementary and middle school teacher Claudio Sanchez is an Education Correspondent for NPR. He focuses on the "three p's" of education reform: politics, policy and pedagogy. Sanchez's reports air regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

Sanchez joined NPR in 1989, after serving for a year as executive producer for the El Paso, Texas, based Latin American News Service, a daily national radio news service covering Latin America and the U.S.- Mexico border.

From 1984 to 1988, Sanchez was news and public affairs director at KXCR-FM in El Paso. During this time, he contributed reports and features to NPR's news programs.

In 2008, Sanchez won First Prize in the Education Writers Association's National Awards for Education Reporting, for his series "The Student Loan Crisis." He was named as a Class of 2007 Fellow by the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University. In 1985, Sanchez received one of broadcasting's top honors, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton, for a series he co-produced, "Sanctuary: The New Underground Railroad." In addition, he has won the Guillermo Martinez-Marquez Award for Best Spot News, the El Paso Press Club Award for Best Investigative Reporting, and was recognized for outstanding local news coverage by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Sanchez is a native of Nogales, Mexico, and a graduate of Northern Arizona University, with post-baccalaureate studies at the University of Arizona in Tucson.

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Tia Tsosie Begay is a fourth-grade teacher at a small public school on the outskirts of Tucson, Ariz. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Students at Northwood High School in Silver Spring, Md., have many opinions on the affirmative action debate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., joined by Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., (right) and Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks to reporters after the Senate voted overwhelmingly to end debate on the makeover of the widely criticized No Child Left Behind Act. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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In 2008, President George W. Bush addressed his No Child Left Behind act. Congress now appears ready to overhaul the law, which is the nation's most important federal education act. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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Students cheer while listening to protesters, following the announcement that Tim Wolfe, the president of the University of Missouri System, would resign. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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NPR Ed

With Campus Racism, How Can College Presidents Get It Right?

The resignation of the head of the University of Missouri System raises an important question: How should he have responded?

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Jose Arriaga waits for his friends under the stairs at the end of the school day at Booker T. Washington High School. Jose began his freshman year this semester. Kenneth M. Ruggiano for NPR hide caption

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NPR Ed

10 Years In, Tulsa's Pre-K Investment Is Paying Off

New research finds impressive academic gains from the city's vaunted preschool program now that its first graduates are beginning high school.

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Shaun Harper of the University of Pennsylvania is a co-author of the new report. Stuart Goldenberg/University of Pennsylvania hide caption

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Study Tracks Vast Racial Gap In School Discipline In 13 Southern States

Expulsions and suspensions were much higher for African-American students, researchers found.

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Research suggests nearly two-thirds of young people are seriously sleep deprived. Giordano Poloni/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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High Schoolers And Snooze Buttons: A Public Health Crisis?

Pre-dawn school start times are unhealthy and must change, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Sandy Kress (right) an attorney from Dallas, listens to Texas Education Agency general counsel David Anderson in 2004. Kress was the chief education consultant to the Bush administration's No Child Left Behind initiative. Harry Cabluck/AP hide caption

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We know very little about what goes into standardized tests, who really designs them, and how they're scored. iStockphoto hide caption

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