Claudio Sanchez 2010 i
Doby Photography/NPR
Claudio Sanchez 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Claudio Sanchez

Correspondent, Education, National Desk

Former elementary and middle school teacher Claudio Sanchez is an Education Correspondent for NPR. He focuses on the "three p's" of education reform: politics, policy and pedagogy. Sanchez's reports air regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

Sanchez joined NPR in 1989, after serving for a year as executive producer for the El Paso, Texas, based Latin American News Service, a daily national radio news service covering Latin America and the U.S.- Mexico border.

From 1984 to 1988, Sanchez was news and public affairs director at KXCR-FM in El Paso. During this time, he contributed reports and features to NPR's news programs.

In 2008, Sanchez won First Prize in the Education Writers Association's National Awards for Education Reporting, for his series "The Student Loan Crisis." He was named as a Class of 2007 Fellow by the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University. In 1985, Sanchez received one of broadcasting's top honors, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton, for a series he co-produced, "Sanctuary: The New Underground Railroad." In addition, he has won the Guillermo Martinez-Marquez Award for Best Spot News, the El Paso Press Club Award for Best Investigative Reporting, and was recognized for outstanding local news coverage by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Sanchez is a native of Nogales, Mexico, and a graduate of Northern Arizona University, with post-baccalaureate studies at the University of Arizona in Tucson.

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A social studies class at Campton Elementary School in Wolfe County, Ky. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Kentucky's Unprecedented Success In School Funding Is On The Line
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Vanessa Minero Leon (right) and her older sister, Lizette, work on their homework after school. Vanessa is in the gifted program at her elementary school in Arizona. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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The Rare District That Recognizes Gifted Latino Students
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Before Alejandra Galindo, 17, was identified as gifted, she was identified as an ELL, or English Language Learner. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Gifted, But Still Learning English, Many Bright Students Get Overlooked
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NPR's Claudio Sanchez visits the site of Treehaven — the school where he taught so many years ago, just outside Tucson, Ariz. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Lessons From The School Where I Failed As A Teacher
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Tia Tsosie Begay is a fourth-grade teacher at a small public school on the outskirts of Tucson, Ariz. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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A 'Wisdom Keeper' Draws From A Deep Well Of Navajo Culture
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Students at Northwood High School in Silver Spring, Md., have many opinions on the affirmative action debate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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What Is Fair? High School Students Talk About Affirmative Action
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Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., joined by Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., (right) and Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks to reporters after the Senate voted overwhelmingly to end debate on the makeover of the widely criticized No Child Left Behind Act. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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New Education Law Passes, With A Power Shift Back To The States
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