Ari Shapiro Ari Shapiro is co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning newsmagazine.

In Royal Goodbye, Hundreds Line Up To See King Richard III's Coffin

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A statue of the scales of justice stands above the Old Bailey, the courthouse where many high-profile libel cases are tried, in London. The U.K. is a popular place for libel cases to be filed because of laws that make it difficult for journalists or the media to prevail. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

On Libel And The Law, U.S. And U.K. Go Separate Ways

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The view west from London's newest skyscraper looks over the River Thames and St. Paul's Cathedral. Russians have flocked to the English property and banking sectors as the economy crumbles back home. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

Why Russia's Economic Slump Has Been Good For London

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British Teens On Their Way To Syria Are Returned Home

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Rows of potted cocoa plants from around the world. Before a cocoa variety from one country can be planted in another, it first makes a pit stop here, at a quarantine center in rural England. Courtesy of Dr. Andrew J. Daymond hide caption

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Courtesy of Dr. Andrew J. Daymond

The Fate Of The World's Chocolate Depends On This Spot In Rural England

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British Military Spending Cutbacks Spark Global Concern

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Conservative party Chairman Grant Shapps speaks to party supporters after canvassing in London on Saturday. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

No Big Money Or TV Ads — What's With The U.K.'s Low-Key Election?

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Mohammed Emwazi is a Kuwaiti-born Londoner believed to be "Jihadi John," the central figure in the beheading videos released by the self-declared Islamic State. A British group, Cage, was in contact with Emwazi several years ago and claims that his treatment by British security officials contributed to his radicalization. Kyodo/Landov hide caption

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Kyodo/Landov

The British Group With A Very Different Take On 'Jihadi John'

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A Lego model of All Souls Church rests on the altar, which was retained when the Bolton, England, church was renovated into an interfaith community center. The model was built by children taking part in an after-school program there. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

In English Town, Muslims Lead Effort To Create Interfaith Haven

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Members of the Muslim community leave the East London Mosque after prayers before the start of the holy month of Ramadan in June 2014. The mosque has an estimated 7,000 worshippers. Rob Stothard/Getty Images hide caption

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Rob Stothard/Getty Images

Britain's Muslims Still Feel The Need To Explain Themselves

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Construction workers at the Erbil Citadel, which was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site last year. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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After 6,000 Years, Time For A Renovation At Iraq's Citadel

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An Iraqi child who fled fighting between the so-called Islamic State and Kurdish peshmerga is among the some 3,000 people living at the Baharka camp, near Irbil, the capital of the Kurdish autonomous region in northern Iraq, on Jan. 16. Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images

Brutal ISIS Tactics Create New Levels Of Trauma Among Iraqis

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Traditional desserts, like these served in 2010 at the original Naranj restaurant in Damascus, offer sweet, familiar flavors at the restaurant's various locations in the Middle East. A platter like this shows up at the end of every meal at Naranj, and all the pastries are made in-house. Jan Smith/Flickr hide caption

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Jan Smith/Flickr

Lamb Dumplings, Lentils And A Bittersweet Taste Of Home

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Kurdish Peshmerga fighters take positions on the outskirts of Mosul on Jan. 26. The U.S. military says an offensive to drive the Islamic State out of Mosul is expected around April or May. Azad Lashkari/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Azad Lashkari/Reuters /Landov

Iraqi Kurds: We're Ready To Fight For Mosul

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