Ari Shapiro Stephen Voss/NPR hide caption

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Stephen Voss/NPR

Ari Shapiro

Stephen Voss/NPR

Ari Shapiro

Host, All Things Considered

Ari Shapiro has reported from above the Arctic Circle and aboard Air Force One. He has covered wars in Iraq, Ukraine, and Israel, and he has filed stories from five continents. (Sorry, Australia.)

In 2015, Shapiro joined Kelly McEvers, Audie Cornish and Robert Siegel as a weekday co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning afternoon newsmagazine.

Shapiro was previously NPR's International Correspondent based in London, from where he traveled the world covering a wide range of topics for NPR's national news programs.

Shapiro joined NPR's international desk in 2014 after four years as White House Correspondent during President Barack Obama's first and second terms. In 2012, Shapiro embedded with the presidential campaign of Republican Mitt Romney. He was NPR Justice Correspondent for five years during the George W. Bush Administration, covering one of the most tumultuous periods in the Department's history.

Shapiro is a frequent guest analyst on television news programs, and his reporting has been consistently recognized by his peers. The Columbia Journalism Review honored him with a laurel for his investigation into disability benefits for injured American veterans. The American Bar Association awarded him the Silver Gavel for exposing the failures of Louisiana's detention system after Hurricane Katrina. He was the first recipient of the American Judges' Association American Gavel Award for his work on U.S. courts and the American justice system. And at age 25, Shapiro won the Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize for an investigation of methamphetamine use and HIV transmission.

An occasional singer, Shapiro makes guest appearances with the "little orchestra" Pink Martini, whose recent albums feature several of his contributions. Since his debut at the Hollywood Bowl in 2009, Shapiro has performed live at many of the world's most storied venues, including Carnegie Hall in New York, L'Olympia in Paris, and Mount Lycabettus in Athens.

Shapiro was born in Fargo, North Dakota, and grew up in Portland, Oregon. He is a magna cum laude graduate of Yale. He began his journalism career as an intern for NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg, who has also occasionally been known to sing in public.

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Story Archive

Billy Manes, Voice For Orlando's Gay Community After Pulse Shooting, Dies at 45

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Lawrence Osborne Doesn't Care If You Like His Characters In 'Beautiful Animals'

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#19 Eric Dorsey, 41 y/o 2/5/16 at 8:54am 3900 Penhurst Ave. This image is part of artist Amy Berbert's series Stains on the Sidewalk, where she photographs the space where someone was killed in Baltimore on the one year anniversary of their death. Courtesy of Amy Berbert hide caption

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Courtesy of Amy Berbert

'Stains On The Sidewalk': Photographer Remembers Year Of Murders In Baltimore

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Dina Nayeri is also the author of A Teaspoon of Earth and Sea. Anna Leader/Riverhead Books hide caption

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Anna Leader/Riverhead Books

'I'm A Bit Of A Chameleon': A Writer Draws From Her Own Life In 'Refuge'

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Leo Blundo (left) and Joe Burdzinski are officials with the Nye County Republican Central Committee. Sam Gringlas/NPR hide caption

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Sam Gringlas/NPR

Nevada Voters, Divided Over Health Care, Put Moderate Republican In Tough Spot

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A group of men with full glasses proudly pose with their keg of beer in San Francisco, 1895. Underwood Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Underwood Archives/Getty Images

How The Story Of Beer Is The Story Of America

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Maryland Farmer Fights To Keep Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Alive

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Billy Crook's commercial crabbing boat, Pilot's Bride. He says it's looking like it's going to be a good year for crabbing on the Chesapeake Bay. Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR hide caption

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Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR

Chesapeake Bay Dead Zones Are Fading, But Proposed EPA Cuts Threaten Success

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In the third season of Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, Titus Andromedon (Tituss Burgess) gets through heartbreak by making his own version of Beyonce's Lemonade. Eric Liebowitz/Netflix hide caption

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Eric Liebowitz/Netflix

Tituss Burgess Says He Plays The Most 'Everyman' Character On 'Kimmy Schmidt'

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Liam James Doyle/NPR

Confronting The Possibility Of Monsters In 'The Essex Serpent'

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South African legend Miriam Makeba performing at Zaire 74. The performances of the African artists on the 1974 music festival's lineup have been unearthed for a new live album. Courtesy of Stewart Levine hide caption

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Courtesy of Stewart Levine

Before The Rumble In The Jungle, Music Rang Out At Zaire 74

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alt-J's new album, Relaxer, is out June 2. Mads Perch/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Mads Perch/Courtesy of the artist

alt-J Talk Chasing Excitement And Magic On A Confident New Album

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Mike and Amy Mills' famous smoked chicken wings, as prepared in Ari Shapiro's backyard. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

'Praise The Lard': A Barbecue Legend Shows Us How To Master Smoked Chicken Wings

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Sylvan Esso's second album, What Now, comes out April 28. Shervin Lainez/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Shervin Lainez/Courtesy of the artist

Sylvan Esso On The Pressure To Make Magic — Again

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Captain Janine Garner on her second deployment in 2007 refueling the Al Asad air base in Iraq Maj. Janine Garner hide caption

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Maj. Janine Garner

Female Marines Tackle What They Call A Corps' 'Culture of Sexism'

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