Using a digital device that displays Braille characters, Haben Girma talks with President Obama at a White House ceremony marking the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. White House photo/Courtesy of Haben Girma hide caption

itoggle caption White House photo/Courtesy of Haben Girma

At the State Department conference for people with disabilities, adviser Judy Heumann (center) is surrounded by admirers from around the world. Joseph Shapiro/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Joseph Shapiro/NPR

"This elevator is a gift from the disability community and the ADA to the nondisabled people of New York," says Attorney Wolinsky, who co-founded Disability Rights Advocates. The elevator at the Dyckman Street Subway Station in Inwood, Manhattan, helps people of all abilities reach the platform. Michael Rubenstein for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Michael Rubenstein for NPR

When Sara Garcia's son, Mark, was released from solitary confinement, she also became his unofficial case manager: seeking a psychiatrist, job leads and writing out applications for food stamps. Julia Robinson for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Julia Robinson for NPR

Brian Nelson, 50, at his home in Chicago. Five years after he was released from solitary confinement, he says it's still hard to be around people. Peter Hoffman for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Peter Hoffman for NPR

Edward Brown, who was jailed for not paying fines he couldn't afford, is among 16 plaintiffs in two lawsuits filed against the cities of Ferguson and Jennings, Mo. Joseph Shapiro/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Joseph Shapiro/NPR

Tonya DeBerry (center) and her children, Herbert Nelson and Allison Nelson, have all been held in Ferguson and Jennings jails for unpaid traffic tickets. Joseph Shapiro/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Joseph Shapiro/NPR

McArthur Edwards' driver's license was suspended for two years because he was unable to pay a $64 fine. He's using this bus stop to commute. Joseph Shapiro/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Joseph Shapiro/NPR

Desiree Seats, 23, lost her license for two years before she even got it because of an unpaid fine. Without a license, she couldn't find the jobs she needed to start earning money. Joseph Shapiro/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Joseph Shapiro/NPR

Sharnalle Mitchell (center) in Montgomery in May, after winning an injunction to stop the city from collecting court fines. With her (from left): attorney Alec Karakatsanis, fellow plaintiffs Lorenzo Brown and Tito Williams and attorney Matt Swerdlin. Courtesy of Alec Karakatsanis hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Alec Karakatsanis

John Kelly speaks during a campus rally about sexual violence at Tufts University on May 1. Courtesy of Leah Mushkin-Pierret hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Leah Mushkin-Pierret