Jordan's election laws make it impossible for any one political party to build a strong bloc in Parliament. Observers say that's one reason for the country's weakness — and for the growing appeal of the messages used by militants of the self-proclaimed Islamic State. Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images

Lina Ejeilat helped found the Jordanian online magazine 7iber (pronounced 'Hebber'). While the government encourages free expression in principle, many strict regulations remain, as noted by the satirical chart next to her. Art Silverman/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Art Silverman/NPR

Jordanians marched in the streets of the capital Amman on Feb. 6 to show solidarity with the family of a pilot killed by the Islamic State in Syria. Jordanians also expressed support for the king's decision to take part in the U.S.-led coalition against ISIS. Muhammad Hamed/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Muhammad Hamed/Reuters/Landov

Jordanian soldiers stand guard at the Iraq-Jordan border last year. Jordan also shares a border with Syria and has had to deal with a flood of refugees from both its neighbors over the past decade. Jamal Nasrallah/EPA/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Jamal Nasrallah/EPA/Landov

Republican senatorial candidate Joni Ernst speaks to the media after a debate. Polls show Democrat Bruce Braley running as many as 14 points ahead of Ernst among women. Justin Hayworth/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Justin Hayworth/AP