Robert Siegel Robert Siegel is senior host of NPR's award-winning evening newsmagazine All Things Considered.
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Robert Siegel 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Robert Siegel

Senior Host, All Things Considered

Robert Siegel is senior host of NPR's award-winning evening newsmagazine All Things Considered. With 40 years of experience working in radio news, Siegel hosts the country's most-listened-to, afternoon-drive-time news radio program and reports on stories and happenings all over the globe. As a host, Siegel has reported from a variety of locations across Europe, the Middle East, North Africa, and Asia.

In 2010, Siegel was recognized by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism with the John Chancellor Award. Siegel has been honored with three Silver Batons from Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia University, first in 1984 for All Things Considered's coverage of peace movements in East and West Germany. He shared in NPR's 1996 Silver Baton Award for "The Changing of the Guard: The Republican Revolution," for coverage of the first 100 days of the 104th Congress. He was part of the NPR team that won a Silver Baton for the network's coverage of the 2008 earthquake in Sichuan Province, China.

Other awards Siegel has earned include a 1997 American Bar Association's Silver Gavel Award for the two-part documentary, "Murder, Punishment, and Parole in Alabama" and the National Mental Health Association's 1991 Mental Health Award for his interviews conducted on the streets of New York in an All Things Considered story, "The Mentally Ill Homeless."

Siegel joined NPR in December 1976 as a newscaster and became an editor the following year. In 1979, Siegel became NPR's first staffer based overseas when he was chosen to open NPR's London bureau, where he worked as senior editor until 1983. After London, Siegel served for four years as director of the News and Information Department, overseeing production of NPR's newsmagazines All Things Considered and Morning Edition, as well as special events and other news programming. During his tenure, NPR launched its popular Saturday and Sunday newsmagazine Weekend Edition. He became host of All Things Considered in 1987.

Before coming to NPR, Siegel worked for WRVR Radio in New York City as a reporter, host and news director. He was part of the WRVR team honored with an Armstrong Award for the series, "Rockefeller's Drug Law." Prior to WRVR, he was morning news reporter and telephone talk show host for WGLI Radio in Babylon, New York.

A graduate of New York's Stuyvesant High School and Columbia University, Siegel began his career in radio at Columbia's radio station, WKCR-FM. As a student he anchored coverage of the 1968 Columbia demonstrations and contributed to the work that earned the station an award from the Writers Guild of America East.

Siegel is the editor of The NPR Interviews 1994, The NPR Interviews 1995 and The NPR Interviews 1996, compilations of NPR's most popular radio conversations from each year.

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Third-year students at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine learn how to trim crowns and prep a tooth for a crown. They're also learning to deal with the aftereffects, studying alternatives to opioids for pain relief. Jessica Cheung/NPR hide caption

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Dental Schools Add An Urgent Lesson: Think Twice About Prescribing Opioids

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Stephen Wade's new album, Across the Amerikee: Showpieces from Coal Camp to Cattle Trail, was released this June. Michael G. Stewart/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Stephen Wade Goes 'Across The Amerikee' With Historical Banjo And Guitar Music

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FDA Announces Plan To Cut Level Of Nicotine Allowed In Cigarettes

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For Sen. John McCain, A Momentous Few Days

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Vicki Reid, right, holds a likeness of John Martin, who was then CEO of the pharmaceutical company Gilead Sciences. Reid and others were protesting high drug prices in front of the conference on retroviruses and opportunistic infections — a meeting held at the World Congress Center in Atlanta in March 2013. John Amis/AP Images for AIDS Healthcare Foundation hide caption

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As Cost Of U.S. Health Care Skyrockets, So Does Pay Of Health Care CEOs

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Trump Says Transgender People Will Be Banned From Military

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San Antonio Trailer Tragedy: What It Says About Human Trafficking

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Senate Scores Narrow Win In Effort to Dismantle Affordable Care Act

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Maurice Sendak wrote and illustrated Where the Wild Things Are and In the Night Kitchen. The illustration above is from Presto and Zesto in Limboland, a book he completed with his friend Arthur Yorinks more than 20 years ago. Sendak died in 2012. Copyright 2017 by The Maurice Sendak Foundation hide caption

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Copyright 2017 by The Maurice Sendak Foundation

Collaborator Says Sendak Would Be 'Jumping For Joy' Over New Publication

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London Literally Stank In The Summer Of 1858 — Just Ask Dickens And Darwin

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Fethullah Gulen sits in a room at his compound in Saylorsburg, Pa. He has lived in exile in the United States since the late 1990s. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan blames Gulen for last year's failed coup and is seeking his extradition. Bryan Thomas for NPR hide caption

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Cleric Accused Of Plotting Turkish Coup Attempt: 'I Have Stood Against All Coups'

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Turkish Cleric Denies Involvement In Coup Attempt

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Babies exposed to opioids in utero may experience withdrawal symptoms at birth, but these symptoms are treatable. Typically, the babies can go home after a few days or a couple weeks. Getty Images hide caption

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For Newborns Exposed To Opioids, Health Issues May Be The Least Of Their Problems

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Coal and steel jobs were once plentiful in Steubenville, Ohio. Today, the local hospital is the top employer in the county. Courtesy of Rana Xavier hide caption

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Courtesy of Rana Xavier

After Decline Of Steel And Coal, Ohio Fears Health Care Jobs Are Next

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