Doby Photography/NPR
Robert Siegel 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Robert Siegel

Senior Host, All Things Considered

Robert Siegel is senior host of NPR's award-winning evening newsmagazine All Things Considered. With 40 years of experience working in radio news, Siegel hosts the country's most-listened-to, afternoon-drive-time news radio program and reports on stories and happenings all over the globe. As a host, Siegel has reported from a variety of locations across Europe, the Middle East, North Africa, and Asia.

In 2010, Siegel was recognized by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism with the John Chancellor Award. Siegel has been honored with three Silver Batons from Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia University, first in 1984 for All Things Considered's coverage of peace movements in East and West Germany. He shared in NPR's 1996 Silver Baton Award for "The Changing of the Guard: The Republican Revolution," for coverage of the first 100 days of the 104th Congress. He was part of the NPR team that won a Silver Baton for the network's coverage of the 2008 earthquake in Sichuan Province, China.

Other awards Siegel has earned include a 1997 American Bar Association's Silver Gavel Award for the two-part documentary, "Murder, Punishment, and Parole in Alabama" and the National Mental Health Association's 1991 Mental Health Award for his interviews conducted on the streets of New York in an All Things Considered story, "The Mentally Ill Homeless."

Siegel joined NPR in December 1976 as a newscaster and became an editor the following year. In 1979, Siegel became NPR's first staffer based overseas when he was chosen to open NPR's London bureau, where he worked as senior editor until 1983. After London, Siegel served for four years as director of the News and Information Department, overseeing production of NPR's newsmagazines All Things Considered and Morning Edition, as well as special events and other news programming. During his tenure, NPR launched its popular Saturday and Sunday newsmagazine Weekend Edition. He became host of All Things Considered in 1987.

Before coming to NPR, Siegel worked for WRVR Radio in New York City as a reporter, host and news director. He was part of the WRVR team honored with an Armstrong Award for the series, "Rockefeller's Drug Law." Prior to WRVR, he was morning news reporter and telephone talk show host for WGLI Radio in Babylon, New York.

A graduate of New York's Stuyvesant High School and Columbia University, Siegel began his career in radio at Columbia's radio station, WKCR-FM. As a student he anchored coverage of the 1968 Columbia demonstrations and contributed to the work that earned the station an award from the Writers Guild of America East.

Siegel is the editor of The NPR Interviews 1994, The NPR Interviews 1995 and The NPR Interviews 1996, compilations of NPR's most popular radio conversations from each year.

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Story Archive

Maurice Sendak wrote and illustrated Where the Wild Things Are and In the Night Kitchen. The illustration above is from Presto and Zesto in Limboland, a book he completed with his friend Arthur Yorinks more than 20 years ago. Sendak died in 2012. Copyright 2017 by The Maurice Sendak Foundation hide caption

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Copyright 2017 by The Maurice Sendak Foundation

Collaborator Says Sendak Would Be 'Jumping For Joy' Over New Publication

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London Literally Stank In The Summer Of 1858 — Just Ask Dickens And Darwin

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Fethullah Gulen sits in a room at his compound in Saylorsburg, Pa. He has lived in exile in the United States since the late 1990s. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan blames Gulen for last year's failed coup and is seeking his extradition. Bryan Thomas for NPR hide caption

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Bryan Thomas for NPR

Cleric Accused Of Plotting Turkish Coup Attempt: 'I Have Stood Against All Coups'

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Turkish Cleric Denies Involvement In Coup Attempt

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Babies exposed to opioids in utero may experience withdrawal symptoms at birth, but these symptoms are treatable. Typically, the babies can go home after a few days or a couple weeks. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

For Newborns Exposed To Opioids, Health Issues May Be The Least Of Their Problems

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Coal and steel jobs were once plentiful in Steubenville, Ohio. Today, the local hospital is the top employer in the county. Courtesy of Rana Xavier hide caption

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Courtesy of Rana Xavier

After Decline Of Steel And Coal, Ohio Fears Health Care Jobs Are Next

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NIH Director Francis Collins and Renée Fleming, who is Artistic Advisor at Large for the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., sing a duet. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

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The Soprano And The Scientist: A Conversation About Music And Medicine

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(From left to right) Mackenzie Stamper, Adrian Rodriguez and Luke Ryan attend weekly Suzuki violin lessons with instructor Sara Johnson, part of a training program called MILEStone, or Music Impacting Language Expertise. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

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Using Music And Rhythm To Help Kids With Grammar And Language

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Jury selection began Wednesday in a defamation case over ABC News' 2012 reports on a South Dakota meat producer's lean, finely textured beef product, which critics dubbed "pink slime." Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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'Pink Slime' Trial Begins, But It's The News Media Under The Microscope

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Most of the people in a choir at Ryerson University in Toronto have joined a study testing how practicing music might help people with hearing loss handle noisy environments better. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

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'Like Brain Boot Camp': Using Music To Ease Hearing Loss

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Walt Mossberg has been reporting on technology since the 1990s. He plans to retire in June. Mike Kepka/Courtesy of Walt Mossberg hide caption

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Mike Kepka/Courtesy of Walt Mossberg

After Decades Covering It, Tech Still Amazes Walt Mossberg

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North Koreans walk in downtown Pyongyang on April 18. Wong Maye-E/AP hide caption

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Wong Maye-E/AP

In North Korea's Capital, More Abundance Than Expected In Everyday Life

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Steven Mallory stands with his family. From left: Tracey Mallory, Steven Mallory, Tina Groves, Zharia Mallory, along with his grandchildren. Jessica Cheung/NPR hide caption

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Two Decades Later, Success For Man Who Imagined Turning His Life Around

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German-born Robert Prager was lynched in Collinsville, Ill., in 1918. Some Germans and German-Americans were attacked during World War I. Courtesy of Jeffrey Manuel hide caption

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Courtesy of Jeffrey Manuel

During World War I, U.S. Government Propaganda Erased German Culture

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Lynching Of Robert Prager Underlined Anti-German Sentiment During World War I

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