Joanne Silberner Joanne Silberner is a health policy correspondent for National Public Radio. She covers medicine, health reform, and changes in the health care marketplace.

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The elaborate Alnwick Garden in northeast England includes a "Poison Garden" that showcases plants with killer properties. Visitors are invited to look but not touch or even smell. Joanne Silberner for NPR hide caption

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Joanne Silberner for NPR

India's Community Approach To Depression Tackles Treatment Shortage

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Sally Deng for NPR

When There's No Therapist, How Can The Depressed Find Help?

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Patient and counselor: In a village near Bhopal, India, a woman with depression (left) meets with her counselor. The counselor, who lives nearby and speaks the same dialect, has received three weeks of intensive training. The patient says the counselor changed her life for the better. Joanne Silberner for NPR hide caption

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Joanne Silberner for NPR

Neighbors Treating Neighbors For Depression And Alcoholism

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High school students in Tanzania gather in a Mental Health Listening Club — first comes the soap opera, then the chance to ask questions about topics like depression. Omar Dabaghi-Pacheco for Farm Radio International hide caption

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Omar Dabaghi-Pacheco for Farm Radio International

A mentally ill patient in Afghanistan at the Mia Ali Baba holy shrine in the village of Samar Khel. The mentally ill are thought to be possessed by demons and so are chained for 40 days. Noorullah Shirzada/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noorullah Shirzada/AFP/Getty Images
Maria Fabrizio for NPR

What Happens If You Try To Prevent Every Single Suicide?

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Physicians Nowiba Mugambi and Erica Palys discuss a patient's X-ray at the Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital in Eldoret, Kenya. The hospital plans to open a new cancer treatment center in April. Evelyn Hockstein/Courtesy of AMPATH hide caption

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Evelyn Hockstein/Courtesy of AMPATH

Tony McMichael has written more than 300 papers on how erratic weather and climate can cause health problems. He died in September. James Giggacher/Courtesy of Australian National University hide caption

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James Giggacher/Courtesy of Australian National University

The documentary film, "Every Last Child," chronicles the efforts to eradicate polio in Pakistan. Women play a key role — they're welcome in homes to share information, while men are not. Courtesy of "Every Last Child" hide caption

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Courtesy of "Every Last Child"

A look at some of the stuff I snagged in the exhibit hall of the American Public Health Association meeting in Denver. Joanne Silberner/NPR hide caption

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