Thanksgiving At The White House: First families have a lot to be thankful for — including the world-class chefs who make their food. Susan Stamberg shares her mother-in-law's cranberry relish recipe with two veteran presidential chefs. They say it reminds them of the infamous "cheddar cheese ring" from the Carter administration. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

In a charcoal and pastel version of Dancers at the Barre, Degas tries out a variation on the dancers' head and leg positions.

National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa hide caption

itoggle caption National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa

Quintana Roo Dunne takes in the ocean view with her parents, John Gregory Dunne and Joan Didion in Malibu in 1976. Quintana Roo fell ill in 2003, and her father had a fatal heart attack several days later. Blue Nights is Didion's elegy for her daughter who died in 2005 at age 39.

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itoggle caption John Bryson/Time Life Pictures/Getty Images

By 1985, Warhol's style had evolved substantially; on this untitled headline piece, he collaborated with Keith Haring. National Gallery of Art hide caption

itoggle caption National Gallery of Art

In 1992, Lesage started an embroidery school to pass on to a new generation the techniques of an art form threatened by mass-produced fashion. Olivier Saillant/Maison Lesage hide caption

itoggle caption Olivier Saillant/Maison Lesage

Wendy Wasserstein in 1985, beneath a poster for her play Isn't It Romantic. Wasserstein's plays examined the place where the upheaval witnessed by the baby boom generation met the demands of family and professional life. Ed Baily/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Ed Baily/AP

The High Museum of Art commissioned nendo, a Japanese design collective, to create Visible Structures — a 12-piece installation of furniture made out of form core and cardboard, reinforced with graphite tape. Masayuki Hayashi hide caption

itoggle caption Masayuki Hayashi

Alfred Stieglitz attached this photograph to a letter for Georgia O'Keeffe, dated July 10, 1929. Below the photograph he wrote, "I have destroyed 300 prints to-day. And much more literature. I haven't the heart to destroy this..." Yale Collection of American Literature, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library hide caption

itoggle caption Yale Collection of American Literature, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library

An artist's rendering of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial on Washington, D.C.'s Tidal Basin. The Lincoln Memorial, where King gave his I Have A Dream speech in 1963, is in the background. Courtesy of Interface Media and the Washington, D.C. Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial Project Foundation, Inc. hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Interface Media and the Washington, D.C. Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial Project Foundation, Inc.