Wendy Wasserstein in 1985, beneath a poster for her play Isn't It Romantic. Wasserstein's plays examined the place where the upheaval witnessed by the baby boom generation met the demands of family and professional life. Ed Baily/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Ed Baily/AP

The High Museum of Art commissioned nendo, a Japanese design collective, to create Visible Structures — a 12-piece installation of furniture made out of form core and cardboard, reinforced with graphite tape. Masayuki Hayashi hide caption

itoggle caption Masayuki Hayashi

Alfred Stieglitz attached this photograph to a letter for Georgia O'Keeffe, dated July 10, 1929. Below the photograph he wrote, "I have destroyed 300 prints to-day. And much more literature. I haven't the heart to destroy this..." Yale Collection of American Literature, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library hide caption

itoggle caption Yale Collection of American Literature, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library

An artist's rendering of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial on Washington, D.C.'s Tidal Basin. The Lincoln Memorial, where King gave his I Have A Dream speech in 1963, is in the background. Courtesy of Interface Media and the Washington, D.C. Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial Project Foundation, Inc. hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Interface Media and the Washington, D.C. Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial Project Foundation, Inc.

Margaret Mitchell, pictured above in 1941, started writing while recovering from an ankle injury in 1926. She had read her way through most of Atlanta's Carnegie Library, so her husband brought home a typewriter and said: "Write your own book to amuse yourself." The result was Gone with the Wind. Al Aumuller/Telegram & Sun/Library of Congress hide caption

itoggle caption Al Aumuller/Telegram & Sun/Library of Congress

Impressionist paintings of Paris often depict a city full of sun-dappled socialites: dancing, shopping, boating and schmoozing. But for painter and art patron Gustave Caillebotte, Paris was a darker, lonelier place. His 1877 work, Paris Street; Rainy Day, shows Parisians making their way down a vast street on a dreary day. (Click enlarge to see the full painting.) The Art Institute of Chicago hide caption

itoggle caption The Art Institute of Chicago

Metsu's 1664 painting A Man Writing a Letter depicts a handsome young scribe penning his correspondence in an opulent study. Roy Hewson/National Gallery of Ireland hide caption

itoggle caption Roy Hewson/National Gallery of Ireland

A painter touches up one of the bridge's cables. When it came time to decide the paint color for the bridge, consulting architect Irving Morrow wanted a warm hue to contrast with the cool grays, blues and greens of San Francisco Bay. Courtesy of goldengatebridge.org hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of goldengatebridge.org

Maggy Rozycki Hiltner's Hothouse Flowers, made of found fabrics, is one of many works on display in the Textile Museum's Green: The Color and the Cause exhibit in Washington, D.C. Click here to see the full textile. Virginia Spragg/ hide caption

itoggle caption Virginia Spragg/

By the time Gauguin arrived in the late 1800s, Tahiti had been "thoroughly Christianized and colonized" by the French, says National Gallery curator Mary Morton. Women didn't walk around half-nude — but Gauguin painted them that way anyway. Above, an 1899 depiction of Two Tahitian Women. The Metropolitan Museum of Art hide caption

itoggle caption The Metropolitan Museum of Art

A woman dressed in rags is the subject of Tattered and Torn by Alfred Kappes. Oil on canvas, 1886. Smith College Museum of Art, Northampton, Mass hide caption

itoggle caption Smith College Museum of Art, Northampton, Mass