Susan Stamberg Nationally renowned broadcast journalist Susan Stamberg is a special correspondent for NPR.
Susan Stamberg
Antony Nagelmann

Susan Stamberg

Special Correspondent

Nationally renowned broadcast journalist Susan Stamberg is a special correspondent for NPR.

Stamberg is the first woman to anchor a national nightly news program, and has won every major award in broadcasting. She has been inducted into the Broadcasting Hall of Fame and the Radio Hall of Fame. An NPR "founding mother," Stamberg has been on staff since the network began in 1971.

Beginning in 1972, Stamberg served as co-host of NPR's award-winning newsmagazine All Things Considered for 14 years. She then hosted Weekend Edition Sunday, and now reports on cultural issues for Morning Edition and Weekend Edition Saturday.

One of the most popular broadcasters in public radio, Stamberg is well known for her conversational style, intelligence, and knack for finding an interesting story. Her interviewing has been called "fresh," "friendly, down-to-earth," and (by novelist E.L. Doctorow) "the closest thing to an enlightened humanist on the radio." Her thousands of interviews include conversations with Laura Bush, Billy Crystal, Rosa Parks, Dave Brubeck, and Luciano Pavarotti.

Prior to joining NPR, she served as producer, program director, and general manager of NPR Member Station WAMU-FM/Washington, DC. Stamberg is the author of two books, and co-editor of a third. Talk: NPR's Susan Stamberg Considers All Things, chronicles her two decades with NPR. Her first book, Every Night at Five: Susan Stamberg's All Things Considered Book, was published in 1982 by Pantheon. Stamberg also co-edited The Wedding Cake in the Middle of the Road, published in 1992 by W. W. Norton. That collection grew out of a series of stories Stamberg commissioned for Weekend Edition Sunday.

In addition to her Hall of Fame inductions, other recognitions include the Armstrong and duPont Awards, the Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, The Ohio State University's Golden Anniversary Director's Award, and the Distinguished Broadcaster Award from the American Women in Radio and Television.

A native of New York City, Stamberg earned a bachelor's degree from Barnard College, and has been awarded numerous honorary degrees including a Doctor of Humane Letters from Dartmouth College. She is a Fellow of Silliman College, Yale University, and has served on the boards of the PEN/Faulkner Fiction Award Foundation and the National Arts Journalism Program based at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Stamberg has hosted a number of series on PBS, moderated three Fred Rogers television specials for adults, served as commentator, guest or co-host on various commercial TV programs, and appeared as a narrator in performance with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra and the National Symphony Orchestra. Her voice appeared on Broadway in the Wendy Wasserstein play An American Daughter.

Her late husband Louis Stamberg had his career with the State Department's agency for international development. Her son Josh Stamberg, an actor, has appeared in various television series, films, and plays.

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Story Archive

'What She Ate': The Culinary Biographies Of Some Remarkable Women

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Harvey Dunn's 1918 oil painting The Sentry shows a soldier coming up from the trenches. "You see in his eyes what would later become known as the thousand-yard stare," says exhibit curator Peter Jakab. Hugh Talman/National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution hide caption

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Hugh Talman/National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution

Even In 'The War To End All Wars,' There Was Art Coming From The Trenches

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The porches of the 1890s Allison Buildings, shown above in 1910, were later enclosed to provide more space for patient beds. National Archives and Records Administration/National Building Museum hide caption

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National Archives and Records Administration/National Building Museum

'Architecture Of An Asylum' Tracks History Of U.S. Treatment Of Mental Illness

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Senior conservator of paintings Ann Hoenigswald works to fill in elements of Paul Cézanne's Riverbank c. 1895 in the National Gallery of Art's Paintings Conservation Lab in Washington, D.C. Liam James Doyle/NPR hide caption

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Liam James Doyle/NPR

With Chemistry And Care, Conservators Keep Masterpieces Looking Their Best

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'Maudie' Paints Intimate Portrait Of Canadian Painter Maud Lewis

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Lewis used leftover house paint to brighten the walls of the tiny home in Marshalltown that she shared with her husband. Steve Farmer/Art Gallery of Nova Scotia hide caption

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Steve Farmer/Art Gallery of Nova Scotia

Listen to the Story

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Marlene Dietrich in a publicity photo for the film Dishonored (1931), in which she plays an Austrian spy. Eugene Robert Richee/Deutsche Kinemathek - Marlene Dietrich Collection Berlin / Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery hide caption

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Eugene Robert Richee/Deutsche Kinemathek - Marlene Dietrich Collection Berlin / Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery

Gallery Gives Movie Star Marlene Dietrich The Big-Picture Treatment

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Frédéric Bazille's The Family Gathering has none of the quick, airy brushstrokes his future impressionist peers would discover; but the sunshine is there, as are the bright colors. Musee d'Orsay, Paris/Courtesy of the National Gallery of Art hide caption

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Musee d'Orsay, Paris/Courtesy of the National Gallery of Art

Meet Frédéric Bazille, The Impressionist Painter Who Could Have Been

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"From the Desk of Simone de Beauvoir" invites visitors to sit down and explore a replica of the French feminist's desk. Emily Haight/National Museum of Women in the Arts hide caption

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Emily Haight/National Museum of Women in the Arts

Imagine What It Was Like To Sit Down At Simone De Beauvoir's Desk

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Music was always her refuge, but Ella Fitzgerald never thought she would be a singer until she won an Amateur Night contest at the Apollo Theater in 1934. The Rudy Calvo Collection Cache Agency hide caption

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The Rudy Calvo Collection Cache Agency

Early Hardship Couldn't Muffle Ella Fitzgerald's Joy

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Ron Boustead's new album is called Unlikely Valentine. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Jazz Vocalist Ron Boustead's Humor Shines On 'Unlikely Valentine'

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Kerry James Marshall, School of Beauty, School of Culture, acrylic and glitter on unstretched canvas, 2012 Sean Pathasema/The Museum of Contemporary Art hide caption

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Sean Pathasema/The Museum of Contemporary Art

Kerry James Marshall: A Black Presence In The Art World Is 'Not Negotiable'

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