Laura Sydell Laura Sydell is the Digital Culture Correspondent for the NPR's All Things Considered, Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and NPR.org.

The Roxie Theater in San Francisco still has two 35 millimeter projectors, but the switch to digital is inevitable. Laura Sydell/NPR hide caption

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Laura Sydell/NPR

Small Cinemas Struggle As Film Fades Out Of The Picture

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The security breaches at Target and Neiman Marcus have raised questions over how quickly companies are required to disclose that customer information was hacked. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Retailers Can Wait To Tell You Your Card Data Have Been Compromised

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Court: FCC Can't Enforce Net Neutrality

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Appeals Court Strikes Down Open Internet Rules

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Google Buys Home Automation Company Nest

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A Southwest Airlines passenger thanks Mario for giving away free Wii U systems on a flight from New Orleans to Dallas in November. Matt Strasen/Matt Strasen/Invision/AP hide caption

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Matt Strasen/Matt Strasen/Invision/AP

Game Over For Nintendo? Not If Mario And Zelda Fans Keep Playing

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Smartphones offer a way for lower-income people who don't have broadband access at home to connect to the Internet. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Class Trumps Race When It Comes To Internet Access

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A screengrab of a YouTube video of the game Walking Dead from the Swedish gamer known as PewDiePie. Videos of people offering commentary while playing video games are wildly popular on YouTube. YouTube/PewDiePie hide caption

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YouTube/PewDiePie

Hot On YouTube: Videos About Video Games, And Science, Too

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Manny Cardenas, seen here with his 5-year-old daughter Zoe, has earned $16 an hour as a part-time security guard at Google. Laura Sydell/NPR hide caption

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What It's Like To Live On Low Pay In A Land Of Plenty

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Tech companies around the world have set up shop in the financial district in Dublin, Ireland. Peter Muhly/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Muhly/AFP/Getty Images

Amid Cuts And Tax Hikes, Tech Companies Get Love in Ireland

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A screenshot of Half the Sky, where virtual successes sometimes lead to real-life donations. Games For Change hide caption

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Games For Change

For Advocacy Groups, Video Games Are The Next Frontier

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The Sony PlayStation 4 sells for $399. Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images hide caption

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Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images

Will New PlayStation, Xbox Click Beyond The Hard-Core Gamer?

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Judge: Google's Book Copying Doesn't Violate Copyright Law

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Napster founder Shawn Fanning in February 2001, after a ruling that the free Internet-based service must stop allowing copyrighted material to be shared. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/AP

What Today's Online Sharing Companies Can Learn From Napster

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