The two "eyes" on the Anybot are actually a camera and a laser. The camera "sees," the laser points, and the person on the screen controls it all. Anybots.com hide caption

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Cast members of the canceled sitcom Arrested Development reunite at a New Yorker panel in October. Netflix will exclusively stream a new season of the cult hit — and that could bring the service a lot of new subscribers, one analyst says. Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for The New Yorker hide caption

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Occupy Wall Street protesters meditate while a sign bearing their Twitter hashtag hangs from a railing in Zuccotti Park in October. Some activists accused Twitter of censorship because #OccupyWallStreet wasn't appearing on trending lists. Jessica Rinaldi/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Paul Cross, creative director of Rocksmith, plays the game at a demonstration event in San Francisco, Calif.

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The Record

Rocksmith: Guitar Hero Gets Real(er)

A new video game makes use of that guitar that's been hibernating in your attic.

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Bjork's new album, Biophilia, is also an interactive multimedia project.

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Steve Jobs introduces new MacBook Air models at Apple headquarters on Oct. 20, 2010. Some say one of his greatest legacies is his impact on design.

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Steve Jobs holds up an iPhone at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco in June 2010.

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The Galaxy S II is a Samsung smartphone that runs on Android. Analysts say Microsoft could be getting as much as $15 for each phone Samsung sells.

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