In his new book, The Court and the World: American Law and the New Global Realities, Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer details why American courts no longer have any choice about involving themselves in the law beyond U.S. borders. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

As different as their backgrounds were, and even their approaches to judging, when it came to women's rights, Ruth Bader Ginsburg (left) and Sandra Day O'Connor were allies. Courtesy of HarperCollins hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of HarperCollins

Documentation of Roman Totenberg's Stradivarius violin. The instrument went missing after one of Roman's concerts but was rediscovered more than three decades later. Courtesy of the Totenberg family hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of the Totenberg family

Frederik de Pue whisks mayonnaise, instead of raw eggs, into his bearnaise sauce. Ted Robbins/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Ted Robbins/NPR

Speaking about why her conservative colleagues wrote so many dissents this term, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg smiled and said: "Next term I think you'll see some of my colleagues will be more disciplined." Stephan Savoia/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Stephan Savoia/AP

An American flag flies over the U.S. Supreme Court June 29, 2015 in Washington, D.C. This past term, the liberal position won in 19 of the 26 closely-divided ideological cases and eight out of 10 of the most important ones. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The gurney in the the execution chamber at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester, Okla. On Monday the Supreme Court voted 5-4 in a case from Oklahoma that the sedative midazolam can be used in executions without violating the prohibition on cruel and unusual punishment. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Sue Ogrocki/AP

In dissent, Justice Sonia Sotomayor wrote that under the majority's reasoning it would not matter if the prisoner was being "drawn and quartered, slowly tortured to death, or actually burned at the stake," as long as there was no more humane method of execution available. Justice Antonin Scalia orally rebutted Justice Stephen Breyer's dissent, calling it "gobbledygook." Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Carolyn Kaster/AP

Gay rights advocates John Lewis (left), and his spouse Stuart Gaffney kiss across the street from City Hall in San Francisco, on Friday following a ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court that same-sex couples have the right to marry nationwide. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Jeff Chiu/AP

At the heart of the case ruled on by the Supreme Court Thursday are the exchanges where people go online to shop for individual insurance. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Jacquelyn Martin/AP