Barack Obama takes the oath of office beside his wife Michelle and daughters Sasha, right, and Malia, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 20, 2009. Chuck Kennedy/AP hide caption

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The Presidential Oath: Not Always Perfect, But It Gets The Job Done

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For Justice Sotomayor, Books Unlocked Imagination

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Obama's First Oath Of Office Remembered As Less Than Smooth

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Fane Lozman's floating home is docked at a marina in Riviera Beach, Fla., in this undated photo from court documents. Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Supreme Court: Floating Home Still A Man's Castle

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Sotomayor Memoir: Don't Let A Door Stop You

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Sotomayor Found Her 'Competitive Spirit' In Gold Stars

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Supreme Court Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor applauds during a reception in her honor at the White House. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor spoke with NPR in December at the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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A Justice Deliberates: Sotomayor On Love, Health And Family

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Supreme Court Weighs Warrantless Blood Tests In Drunken-Driving Cases

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A photographic screen hangs in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, which is undergoing renovations. On Wednesday, the justices will hear arguments in a case that asks whether police without a warrant can administer a blood test to a suspected drunken driver. Greg E. Mathieson/MAI/Landov hide caption

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Can Police Force Drunken Driving Suspects To Take Blood Tests?

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Robert Bork, nominated by President Reagan to the Supreme Court, is sworn in before the Senate Judiciary Committee at his confirmation hearing, Sept. 15, 1987. John Duricka/AP hide caption

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Robert Bork's Supreme Court Nomination 'Changed Everything, Maybe Forever'

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Edith Windsor, 83, is asking the Supreme Court to strike down the federal Defense of Marriage Act. When Windsor's female spouse died, the federal government, acting under DOMA, required Windsor to pay estate taxes that she would not have owed if her spouse had been a man. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Supreme Court Takes Up Same-Sex-Marriage Cases

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After years of waiting, the Kennedy Center has a new symphonic organ replacing its old Filene organ. The $2 million project will culminate in the organ's debut on Nov. 27. William Neil (left), the National Symphony Orchestra organist, speaks with NSO Assistant Conductor Ankush Kumar Bahl (center) during the organ's test with the orchestra on Oct. 18. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kennedy Center's New Organ No Longer A Pipe Dream

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The U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Supreme Court Hears Case Asking: Who's A Boss?

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