Tiffany Contreras gives a presentation in a nutrition class at Tulsa Community College. She's pursuing a degree in nursing as part of the Career Advance program. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption John W. Poole/NPR

Standardized tests are an important consideration for admissions at many colleges and universities. But one new study shows that high school performance, not standardized test scores, is a better predictor of how students do in college. Amriphoto/iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption Amriphoto/iStockphoto

Alex Tu, an advanced placement student, takes a computer science class in Midwest City, Okla. There's been a sharp decline in the number of computer science classes offered in U.S. secondary schools. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Sue Ogrocki/AP

Silver Lake Elementary School in Middletown, Del., has begun implementing the national Common Core State Standards for academics. The GOP largely backs the standards that are rolling out in 45 states, but Tea Party conservatives have been critical — and liberals increasingly have the same complaints. Steve Ruark/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Steve Ruark/AP

Students at the Oakland Military Institute took several courses offered by San Jose State and the online course provider Udacity this year. The university is now scaling back its relationship with Udacity. Laura A. Oda/MCT/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Laura A. Oda/MCT/Landov

Hands-on science activities like making bubble mitts at the Mission Science Workshop teach students about things like surface tension. Justin Jach/Courtesy of Mission Science Workshop hide caption

itoggle caption Justin Jach/Courtesy of Mission Science Workshop

Students at Lowell High School in Michigan sit down for lunch. Shorter lunch breaks mean that many kids don't get enough time to eat and socialize. Emily Zoladz/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Emily Zoladz/Landov

Shayna Terrell is the outreach coordinator at Simon Gratz Mastery Charter School in Philadelphia. Matt Stanley for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Matt Stanley for NPR

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett, a Republican, cut more than $1 billion from the state's K-12 budget, which hit the state-controlled Philadelphia district hardest. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Matt Slocum/AP