Silver Lake Elementary School in Middletown, Del., has begun implementing the national Common Core State Standards for academics. The GOP largely backs the standards that are rolling out in 45 states, but Tea Party conservatives have been critical — and liberals increasingly have the same complaints. Steve Ruark/AP hide caption

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Steve Ruark/AP

Political Rivals Find Common Ground Over Common Core

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Teacher Job Protections Vs. Students' Education In Calif.

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Students at the Oakland Military Institute took several courses offered by San Jose State and the online course provider Udacity this year. The university is now scaling back its relationship with Udacity. Laura A. Oda/MCT/Landov hide caption

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Laura A. Oda/MCT/Landov

The Online Education Revolution Drifts Off Course

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Hands-on science activities like making bubble mitts at the Mission Science Workshop teach students about things like surface tension. Justin Jach/Courtesy of Mission Science Workshop hide caption

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Justin Jach/Courtesy of Mission Science Workshop

To Make Science Real, Kids Want More Fun

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Students at Lowell High School in Michigan sit down for lunch. Shorter lunch breaks mean that many kids don't get enough time to eat and socialize. Emily Zoladz/Landov hide caption

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Emily Zoladz/Landov

These Days, School Lunch Hours Are More Like 15 Minutes

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Shayna Terrell is the outreach coordinator at Simon Gratz Mastery Charter School in Philadelphia. Matt Stanley for NPR hide caption

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Matt Stanley for NPR

Charter Schools In Philadelphia: Educating Without A Blueprint

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Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett, a Republican, cut more than $1 billion from the state's K-12 budget, which hit the state-controlled Philadelphia district hardest. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum/AP

Unrelenting Poverty Leads To 'Desperation' In Philly Schools

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Duncan Apologizes For 'Clumsy' Common Core Remarks

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Students play tag at Ruby Bridges Elementary in Alameda, Calif. The school has expanded recess time with help from the nonprofit group Playworks. Eric Westervelt/NPR hide caption

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Eric Westervelt/NPR

Trim Recess? Some Schools Hold On To Child's Play

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Coachella Valley High School math teacher Eddie Simoneau uses iPads with his students. Matt Hamilton/Coachella Valley Unified School District hide caption

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Matt Hamilton/Coachella Valley Unified School District

For The Tablet Generation, A Lesson In Digital Citizenship

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Students at Coachella Valley Unified School District use iPads during a lesson. The district's superintendent is promoting the tablet initiative as a way to individualize learning. Coachella Valley Unified School District hide caption

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Coachella Valley Unified School District

A School's iPad Initiative Brings Optimism And Skepticism

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Thousands of students apply to college each year using the online Common Application. But a flawed overhaul of the system has left many students and parents frustrated. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

More Angst For College Applicants: A Glitchy Common App

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Palo Alto middle school student Jennifer Munoz Tello (right) stands outside her family's trailer in Palo Alto with her mother, Sandra, and 2-year-old sister, Cynthia. Eric Westervelt/NPR hide caption

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Silicon Valley Trailer Park Residents Fight To Stay

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A worker on a newly constructed transmission tower near Buetzow, Germany, earlier this month. The German government plans to shut down nuclear power plants and is seeking to replace that production with power from renewable energy sources, especially wind turbines and solar parks. New power transmission lines will be needed. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Germans Confront The Costs Of A Nuclear-Free Future

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