Rep. Paul Ryan has made changes to social safety net programs like Medicare and Social Security — often called "entitlements" — a key part of his political agenda. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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With Ryan's Ascent, A Few Thoughts On 'Entitlement'
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Taboo Revival: Talking Private Parts In Public Places
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The word "hopefully" has been used in thousands of NPR stories. Stephanie d'Otreppe/NPR hide caption

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The Word 'Hopefully' Is Here To Stay, Hopefully
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Slut: The Other Four Letter S-Word
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Geoff Nunberg says the magic of metonymy helped propel the word "occupy" into the global consciousness. Douglas Araujo de Moura /Occuprint hide caption

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'Occupy': Geoff Nunberg's 2011 Word Of The Year
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A message honoring Steve Jobs is scrawled on a blacked-out window at an Apple store in Seattle.

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Steve, Myself And i: The Big Story Of A Little Prefix
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In the Communist Manifesto, Karl Marx (above) and Friedrich Engels used the German word Klassenkampfen, which translates as "class struggles." Their critics rendered it as "class warfare."

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Unlike Most Marxist Jargon, 'Class Warfare' Persists
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No Language Legacy: Where's The Sept. 11 Vocab?
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What The Word 'Compromise' Really Means
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Bad Apple Proverbs: There's One In Every Bunch
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If It Ain't Broke ... The word "broke" comes from an old use of the word break, meaning "impoverished," says linguist Geoff Nunberg. "It suggests an abiding association between destitution and destruction." iStockphoto.com hide caption

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'We're Broke': Empty Bank Accounts, Empty Meaning?
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Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin on Fox News Channel's Hannity, Jan. 17, 2011. FoxNews.com hide caption

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How Traumatic Events Change Our View Of Language
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The Year Of No: Geoff Nunberg declares "no" to be the 2010 word of the year. (In case you're curious, NPR wrote 1,640 articles featuring the word "no" in the past year.) Stephanie d'Otreppe/NPR hide caption

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Knowing Geoff Nunberg's 2010 Word Of The Year
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English novelist Jane Austen is known for her polished prose, but her handwritten manuscripts reveal some telling grammatical errors. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Was Jane Austen Edited? Does It Matter?
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