Alice Fordham i
Kainaz Amaria/NPR
Alice Fordham
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Alice Fordham

International Correspondent, Beirut, Lebanon

Alice Fordham is an NPR International Correspondent based in Beirut, Lebanon.

In this role, she reports on Lebanon, Syria and many of the countries throughout the Middle East.

Before joining NPR in 2014, Fordham covered the Middle East for five years, reporting for The Washington Post, the Economist, The Times and other publications. She has worked in wars and political turmoil but also amid beauty, resilience and fun.

In 2011, Fordham was a Stern Fellow at the Washington Post. That same year she won the Next Century Foundation's Breakaway award, in part for an investigation into Iraqi prisons.

Fordham graduated from Cambridge University with a Bachelor of Arts in Classics.

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A Lebanese woman covers her nose as she walks past piles of garbage on a Beirut street. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Hassan Ammar/AP

At Anise, a bar in Beirut, Lebanon, beloved local herbs like za'atar, sage and rosemary are making their way into cocktails. "We want to do something fresh in our cocktails," says co-owner Marwan Matar. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Iraqi Kurdish singer Helly Luv sings in support of Kurdish fighters, called the peshmerga, who are battling the Islamic State. Her songs are popular among Kurds in northern Iraq, though some critics say her outfits and dancing are un-Islamic. Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and his wife, Tonette, cheer during the 2012 Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla. Tonette Walker's views on issues such as same-sex marriage are potentially at odds with those of her husband, who is expected to announce his presidential run Monday. David Goldman/AP hide caption

itoggle caption David Goldman/AP

In Kairouan, Tunisia, Muslims visit the Great Mosque, one of the oldest and best-known mosques in North Africa. Tunisia has made more political progress than other Arab Spring countries, but it has suffered two major terror attacks in recent months. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Displaced Sunni Iraqis, who fled the violence in Ramadi, arrive at a makeshift camp on the outskirts of Baghdad, in April. Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images

Police patrol the beach at Sousse, Tunisia, on Sunday. Tunisian authorities have deployed additional security forces, closed some mosques and banned some Islamist groups in the wake of Friday's terrorist attack at a beachfront hotel. Abdeljalil Bounhar/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Abdeljalil Bounhar/AP

An Iraqi Shiite militia fighter holds a position in Salahuddin province, north of Baghdad, on May 26. With the Iraqi military performing poorly, militias have played an increasingly important role in the fight against the Islamic State. Mohammed Sawaf/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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